struggle

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put up a fight

1. To struggle, fight, resist, etc. I thought we'd have to get law enforcement involved to get him off the land, but he didn't put up much of a fight in the end. I expect they'll put up a fight when we announce the pay cuts, but they'll either have to accept them or look for other work.
2. To make a brave or valiant effort against someone or something, especially when they or it is stronger than one. Usually modified by the adjective "good." They put up a good fight, but they never really had a chance to defeat us.
See also: fight, put, up

put up a struggle

To engage in a struggle, battle, confrontation, or competition, especially in a determined or courageous manner in the face of very poor chances. He was outclassed from the beginning of the struggle, but the newcomer put up a good struggle against the champ. She and her campaign put up a struggle to the very end, but the writing was on the wall in the weeks leading up to the election that she had lost.
See also: put, struggle, up

give up the fight

To concede or surrender a fight, battle, or confrontation; to relinquish or renounce one's stance on something. The ferocity of their warriors is unmatched—even in the face of certain death, they will never give up the fight. Facing widespread opposition, the administration has been forced to give up the fight on tax reform.
See also: fight, give, up

give up the struggle

To concede or surrender a fight, battle, or confrontation; to relinquish or renounce one's stance on something. The ferocity of their warriors is unmatched—even in the face of certain death, they will never give up the struggle. Facing widespread opposition, the administration has been forced to give up the struggle on tax reform.
See also: give, struggle, up

struggle to death

1. noun A bitter, hard-fought conflict that ends in the death of one of the participants. The battle between this lion and water buffalo truly is a struggle to the death—the victory of one ensures the demise of the other. The underground competition features experienced fighters from all over the world engaging in struggles to the death.
2. noun An extremely difficult or serious challenge. Used hyperbolically. It was a struggle to the death getting that old lawnmower working again, but by God I did it! We knew it would be a struggle to the death negotiating the contract with their firm.
3. verb To engage in a bitter, hard-fought conflict that ends in the death of one of the participants. I know it's morbid, but one of the things I like best about nature documentaries is watching predators and their prey struggling to the death. The crime boss forced the two underlings to struggle to the death, with the winner being spared any further punishment.
See also: death, struggle

struggle to (do something)

To have difficulty or put forth a strenuous effort to do something. The device has proven expensive to manufacture and hard to market, so the company has struggled to make a profit this fiscal year. I've been struggling to understand your reasoning.
See also: struggle

struggle along under (something)

To continue to cope or manage while dealing with some difficult or inconvenient burden or situation. The once-acclaimed director has been struggling along under a series of box-office flops. We struggled along under constant poverty when I was a kid, so I've learned to really appreciate the things I have now.
See also: struggle

struggle along (with something)

To continue to cope or manage with one's current situation or condition, especially when it is difficult, inconvenient, or require strenuous effort. I haven't been enjoying college so far, but I've decided to struggle along for the rest of this year and see how I feel next summer. I just don't have the money for a new phone, so I've been struggling along with the same crappy flip-phone I had in high school.
See also: struggle

struggle on with (something)

To continue doing or using something that is difficult, inconvenient, or require strenuous effort. I know you're not enjoying college so far, but struggle on with the rest of this year and see how you feel next summer. I just don't have the money for a new phone, so I've been struggling on with the same crappy flip-phone I had in high school.
See also: on, struggle

struggle for (something)

To have difficulty or put forth a strenuous effort to achieve, obtain, devise, or produce something. I struggled for words when they presented me the award. I used to be able to crank out a new book every year, but lately I've been struggling for ideas.
See also: struggle

an uphill struggle

A task that is very daunting from the outset and continues to be challenging. The incumbent is so popular that defeating her will be an uphill struggle. I'm terrible at math, so I have a real uphill struggle ahead of me if I want to improve my grade in Algebra.
See also: struggle, uphill

struggle buggy

1. slang, dated One's car when used as a place for sexual activity. Primarily heard in US. The spot is a favorite location of young lovers looking to park their struggle buggies for a late-night romp. I knew he was just trying to tempt me into the backseat of his struggle buggy, but he was so handsome that I couldn't say no!
2. slang, old-fashioned A car that is especially old and in poor condition—that is, one that struggles to run properly. Sometimes hyphenated. Primarily heard in US. I can't believe you drove down the entire West Coast in that old struggle buggy—it's a miracle you even made it! I'm finally trading in my struggle-buggy for a newer model.
See also: buggy, struggle

the struggle is real

A phrase used to emphasize that a particular situation (or life in general) is difficult. It is often used humorously and/or ironically when one is having difficulty doing something that should not be difficult or complaining about something that is not particularly problematic. Man, the struggle is real—it took me five tries to get into that parking space. A: "Ugh, there's a crazy line at the ice cream place right now." B: "Boy, the struggle is real, huh?"
See also: real, struggle

give up the fight

 and give up the struggle 
1. Lit. to quit fighting; to stop trying to do something. Don't give up the fight. Keep trying. Mary refused to give up the struggle.
2. Fig. to give up and die. At the end of months of pain, she gave up the fight. In the end, he lost interest in life and just gave up the struggle.
See also: fight, give, up

put up a fight

 and put up a struggle
to make a struggle, a fight, etc. (Fixed order.) Did he put up a fight? No, he only put up a bit of a struggle.
See also: fight, put, up

struggle against someone or something

to strive or battle against someone or something. There is no point in struggling against me. I will win out. He struggled against the disease for a year before he died.
See also: struggle

struggle along under something

to make do as well as one can under a particular burden. I will have to struggle along under these poor conditions for quite a while. I am sorry you have to struggle along under such burdens.
See also: struggle

struggle along (with someone or something)

to make do as well as one can with someone or something. I really need someone who can work faster, but I'll struggle along with Walter. We struggled along the best we could.
See also: struggle

struggle for something

to strive to obtain something. I was struggling for a law degree when I won the lottery. I had to struggle for everything that came my way.
See also: struggle

struggle on with something

to make do as well as one can with something. I will have to struggle on with the car that I have. We will struggle on with what we have, hoping for better someday.
See also: on, struggle

struggle through (something)

to get through something in the best way possible. I am going to struggle through this dull book to the very end. The course was dull, but I struggled through.
See also: struggle, through

struggle to do something

to strive or battle to do something. She struggled hard to meet her deadlines. We had to struggle to make ends meet.
See also: struggle

struggle to the death

 
1. Lit. a bitter struggle ending in death. The wolf and the elk fought in a struggle to the death.
2. Fig. a serious problem with someone or something; a difficult challenge. I had a terrible time getting my car started. It was a struggle to the death, but it finally started.
See also: death, struggle

struggle with someone (for something)

to fight with someone to obtain something. Max struggled with Lefty for the gun, and it went off. Timmy struggled with Bobby for the bicycle, and finally David took it away from both of them.
See also: struggle

struggle with someone or something

to fight or battle with someone or something. Fred struggled with Tom for a while and finally gave in. Tom struggled with the disease for a while and finally succumbed to it.
See also: struggle

uphill battle

 and uphill struggle
Fig. a hard struggle. Convincing the senator to see our point of view was an uphill battle, but we finally succeeded.
See also: battle, uphill

put up a (good) ˈfight

fight or compete bravely against somebody/something stronger than you: The team put up a good fight but in the end they were beaten.She won’t accept the decision — she’ll put up a fight.
See also: fight, put, up

an uphill ˈstruggle/ˈbattle/ˈtask

something that is difficult and takes a lot of effort over a long period of time: After the recent scandal, he faces an uphill struggle to win back public support before the next election.
See also: battle, struggle, task, uphill

struggle buggy

The backseat of a car. This early- and mid-20th-century expression described an auto whose young owner tried to seduce unwilling young women into its backseat for a little (one of the euphemisms for the activity was “backseat boogie”). As the sophomoric joke went, “I call my car the Mayflower because so many Puritans came across in it.”
See also: buggy, struggle
References in classic literature ?
A struggle for existence inevitably follows from the high rate at which all organic beings tend to increase.
In looking at Nature, it is most necessary to keep the foregoing considerations always in mind--never to forget that every single organic being around us may be said to be striving to the utmost to increase in numbers; that each lives by a struggle at some period of its life; that heavy destruction inevitably falls either on the young or old, during each generation or at recurrent intervals.
The action of climate seems at first sight to be quite independent of the struggle for existence; but in so far as climate chiefly acts in reducing food, it brings on the most severe struggle between the individuals, whether of the same or of distinct species, which subsist on the same kind of food.
When a species, owing to highly favourable circumstances, increases inordinately in numbers in a small tract, epidemics--at least, this seems generally to occur with our game animals--often ensue: and here we have a limiting check independent of the struggle for life.
Many cases are on record showing how complex and unexpected are the checks and relations between organic beings, which have to struggle together in the same country.
What a struggle between the several kinds of trees must here have gone on during long centuries, each annually scattering its seeds by the thousand; what war between insect and insect--between insects, snails, and other animals with birds and beasts of prey--all striving to increase, and all feeding on each other or on the trees or their seeds and seedlings, or on the other plants which first clothed the ground and thus checked the growth of the trees
This is often the case with those which may strictly be said to struggle with each other for existence, as in the case of locusts and grass-feeding quadrupeds.
As species of the same genus have usually, though by no means invariably, some similarity in habits and constitution, and always in structure, the struggle will generally be more severe between species of the same genus, when they come into competition with each other, than between species of distinct genera.
All that we can do, is to keep steadily in mind that each organic being is striving to increase at a geometrical ratio; that each at some period of its life, during some season of the year, during each generation or at intervals, has to struggle for life, and to suffer great destruction.
My brother immediately grasped the situation, shouted, and hurried towards the struggle.
With God in our midst, we are all more than our struggles.
Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world.
Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, |above, struggles with dyslexia and revealed that he finished reading his first book at the age of 38
Fewer Americans are unemployed or underemployed in 2014, which may be related to the improvement in Americans' struggles to afford food.
It offers case histories of the struggles by insiders themselves who recount the lessons they learned in the process of the educational system's struggles.