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a change in (one's) stripes

A radical, fundamental shift in one's opinion, ideology, or allegiance, especially in relation to politics. Derived from the phrase "a tiger cannot change its stripes," meaning that people are incapable of changing their essential nature. The former president has shown a change in stripes regarding social welfare since leaving office.
See also: change, stripe

change (one's) stripes

To radically or fundamentally shift one's opinion, ideology, or allegiance, especially in relation to politics. Derived from the phrase "a tiger cannot change its stripes," meaning that people are incapable of changing their essential nature. The former president has changed her stripes regarding social welfare since leaving office.
See also: change, stripe

of the same stripe

Of the same or similar kind; in the same vein; along the same lines. You'll often get arguments of the same stripe from undergraduate students full of undigested learning, who think they know how to fix all of society's ills. He identifies himself as a socialist, but not of the same stripe as the Marxists and Leninists of the mid-20th century.
See also: of, same, stripe

show (one's) (true) stripes

To reveal what one really believes, thinks, or wants; to act in accordance with one's real personality, character, or disposition. (A less common variant of "show one's (true) colors/colours.") Dave said all along that he only wanted this deal because it was in the company's best interest, but he showed his true stripes once he realized that he wouldn't get any special commission for his efforts. It's only in times of crisis that your friends will really show their stripes.
See also: show, stripe

(one's) (true) stripes

One's true or honest beliefs, thoughts, convictions, biases, desires, etc.; one's real personality, character, or disposition. (A less common variant of "one's (true) colors.") Dave said all along that he only wanted this deal because it was in the company's best interest, but he showed his true stripes once he realized that he wouldn't get any special commission for his efforts. You will really see your friends' true stripes when you call upon them in a time of crisis.
See also: stripe

reveal (one's) (true) stripes

To reveal what one really believes, thinks, or wants; to act in accordance with one's real personality, character, or disposition. (A less common variant of "show one's (true) colors.") Dave said all along that he only wanted this deal because it was in the company's best interest, but he revealed his true stripes once he realized that he wouldn't get any special commission for his efforts. It's only in times of crisis that your friends will really reveal their stripes.
See also: reveal, stripe

earn your stripes

to do something to show that you deserve a particular rank or position She earned her stripes as a local reporter before becoming a foreign correspondent.
Etymology: based on the idea that soldiers wear stripes (strips of material sewn onto a uniform that show rank)
See also: earn, stripe

earn your stripes

to do something to show that you deserve a particular rank or position and have the skills needed for it She earned her stripes as a junior reporter before becoming education correspondent.
See earn brownie points, earn spurs
See also: earn, stripe

change one's stripes

See also: change, stripe

earn one's stripes

Gain a position through hard work and accumulated experience. For example, She'd earned her stripes by serving for years as the governor's secretary and personal aide . This expression alludes to a military promotion or award, indicated by strips of chevron or braid added to the recipient's uniform and known as stripes since the early 1800s.
See also: earn, stripe

leopard cannot change its spots, a

Also, the tiger cannot change its stripes. One can't change one's essential nature. For example, He's a conservative, no matter what he says; the leopard cannot change its spots. These metaphoric expressions both originated in an ancient Greek proverb that appears in the Bible (Jeremiah 13:23): "Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots?" It was first recorded in English in 1546.
See also: cannot, change, leopard
References in periodicals archive ?
Whatever reason you're drawn to them, the great news is that stripes are like the friend you can bring along to a party.
Rainbow stripe shower curtain, PS12; three-tier caddy, PS28.
On behalf of Stripes, what an honor it is to present $1,405,706 to MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital," said Stripes Convenience Stores Vice President of Marketing, Eduardo Pereda, at a check presentation ceremony to MD Anderson representatives.
With the weather warming up why not try a classic Breton stripe, we guarantee this dress will never date.
Other experiments have found that flies prefer landing on solid colors instead of contrasting stripes.
On the higher end of the stripe scale, French design labels Agnes B and Commes Des Garcons lead the way, but you don't have to spend a lot on this look.
Payton says: "Because stripes are such a strong fashion statement, you don't have to cover yourself in them.
standard calls for ten feet, though depending on the speed limit of the road, the stripes may be as long as twelve or fourteen feet.
The Class II vest is the most popular style, with higher visibility because it has two horizontal stripes and two vertical stripes made of 1-3/8-inch reflective material.
The result is film with thick and thin MD stripes like corduroy fabric, three stripes per millimeter of width (see photo).
The White Stripes are a two-person rock band consisting of guitarist, songwriter, and singer Jack White, and drummer Meg White (the two were married for four years in the 1990s).
In a simplified version of this pattern, each frame is made up of two large magnetic stripes written at an angle with respect to one another.