strip of

strip someone or something of something

to take something, such as status or property, away from someone or something. The court stripped him of all his property. We stripped him of his rights when we put him in jail.
See also: of, strip

strip of

v.
1. To deprive someone or something of some covering or ornament: The tornado stripped the tree of its leaves. The manuscript was stripped of its academic jargon.
2. To deprive someone of some honor, rank, office, privilege, or possession: Losing my job and my house stripped me of my dignity. The officers were court-martialed and stripped of their ranks.
See also: of, strip
References in classic literature ?
First there was a strip of light green silk, then a strip of dark green and then a strip of emerald green; for Oz had a fancy to make the balloon in different shades of the color about them.
Under this row of faint grease prints he would write a record on the strip of white paper--thus:
With slow step and vacant face--moving as if she was walking in her sleep--she led the way to the papered wall; knelt down at the skirting-board; and, taking out two small sharp nails, lifted up a long strip of the paper which had been detached from the plaster beneath.
Partly by signs, and partly by help of the slate, she showed how the mixture could be applied to the back of the loosened strip of paper in the next room--how the paper could be glued to the sound lower part of the wall by tightening the strings--how the strings, having served that purpose, could be safely removed--how the same process could be followed in Geoffrey's room, after the hollowed place had been filled up again with the materials waiting in the scullery, or even without filling up the hollowed place if the time failed for doing it.
Leaning forward, he touched the farther end of the strip of brown stuff that she was hemming.
He drew up to the table again and she sewed on in silence, with dropped lashes, while he sat in fascinated contemplation of the way in which her hands went up and down above the strip of stuff, just as he had seen a pair of birds make short perpendicular flights over a nest they were building.
He took his nose out of the calabash and with his rose-ribbon strip of tongue licked Lamai's hand.
That spring, Jesse had bought part of a long strip of black swamp land that lay in the valley of Wine Creek.
I live on an atoll, a low island, it is a strip of land surrounding a lagoon, and its beauty is the beauty of the sea and sky and the varied colour of the lagoon and the grace of the cocoa-nut trees; but the place where Strickland lived had the beauty of the Garden of Eden.
It stood motionless, rising out of the furthest strip of moonlight on the floor.
There was yet a fertile strip of time wherein to sow my last handful of the wild oats of youth.
We see under the feet of our ponies a mixture of moorland and bog--here, the strip of firm ground that we are standing on, and there, a few feet off, the strip of watery peat-bog, which is deep enough to suffocate us if we step into it.
Its light illuminated a strip of thick tapestry, hanging loose from the ceiling to the floor, on the wall opposite to the door by which we had entered.
Thomas's father was pursued home one night by a lamb of fire with its head cut off hanging by a strip of skin.
I gave him the button; whereupon he strung it on a strip of his great-coat which he had used to bind the cross; and tying in a little sprig of birch and another of fir, he looked upon his work with satisfaction.