strike

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Related to strikes: lockouts, Illegal Strikes

strike (someone or something) down

1. Literally, to knock someone or something down with a heavy blow. The speeding car struck the cyclist down. A huge lightning bolt struck the cedar tree down.
2. To kill someone through tragic circumstances beyond human control. He was struck down by cancer when he was only 42 years old. Let God strike me down if I'm lying!
3. To cancel, annul, invalidate, or render ineffective. The courts struck the law down, declaring it to be unconstitutional. The board of directors struck down our proposal for a new business based in Canada.
See also: down, strike

strike

n. a dose of drugs. (see also hit.) Just one strike, Bart, come on, just one. I’ll pay you tomorrow, Bart, come on, just one little strike. Anything, Bart. I really hurt, Bart.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The strike of the Kfar Yona prison on February 18, 1969, which lasted for eight days.
8 : to produce by or as if by a blow <We'll strike fear into the enemy.
Northwest Airlines flight attendants, prevented from engaging in work actions by a US federal judge last week, yesterday declared negotiations with management at an "impasse" and asked the National Mediation Board for a release from further mediated talks with the carrier, the first step toward gaining legal authority to strike under US laws governing airline labor relations.
EAA leaders hope an official strike sanction from the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, an umbrella organization overseeing 350 unions, would reinvigorate the EAA's campaign for higher wages and also pressure other unions to stay off the job if the EAA mounts another job action.
With the contract covering Local 32BJ employees who work in apartment buildings set to expire at midnight on April 20, the Realty Advisory Board on Labor Relations is urging owners and managing agents to prepare for the possibility of a strike.
Did any Atlantic hurricanes strike the Pacific coast?
We were so surprised to see all these people who just came to say that they were fed up with the unions and fed up with the strikes," Herold remembers, still amazed at the response.
The importance of adopting this cultural definition of a strike is that it enables historians to use strikes differently.
However, the threat of a strike should, if properly evaluated by both sides, make actual strikes extremely rare.
What Baseball had meant to say was "hunt for the high strikes you are not currently calling so that we can shorten the length of games - which are currently running longer than world wars.
Not only that, but the strikes were scattered and staggered, breaking out at one port one day, then another the next.
Strikes and protests remain few, but workers vociferously denounce low wages and high unemployment and impugn the government for allowing foreigners to "take jobs from Germans.
In response to the country's fear and desperation, politicians began touting "three strikes and you're out" as the solution to the problem of violence.
Very few metropolitan areas have experienced nurses' strikes.
Fitch's concerns about the strike include the possibility of negative cash flow due to working capital build-up, which has been substantial in past strikes; lower revenues and profits at BCA; the impact on other contract negotiations later this year, including the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA) contract in the fourth quarter; and the impact on general labor relations after a contract is signed.