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follow (someone or something) in stride

To follow the direction, lead, or guidance (of someone or something); to act in accordance (with someone or something); to follow suit. I hope your little sister doesn't follow your bad behavior in stride. If you can develop a really strong social presence for your company, then your sales will follow in stride. I really hope the new president doesn't follow his predecessor in stride.
See also: follow, stride

make a wide stride

To make great and rapid progress or advancement. The one-time political advisor has been making a wide stride toward absolute control of the country. We've made a wide stride in our commitment to getting the economy back on its feet, but we still have a long road ahead.
See also: make, stride, wide

break one's stride

to deviate from a rhythmic stride while walking, running, or marching. After I broke my stride, I never could pick up enough speed to win the race.
See also: break, stride

get into one's stride

1. Lit. [for a runner] to reach a comfortable and efficient pace. I got into my stride right away, and that helped win the race. She never got into her stride, and that's why she lost.
2. Fig. to reach one's most efficient and productive rate of doing something. When I get into my stride, I'll be more efficient. Amy will be more efficient when she gets into her stride.
See also: get, stride

put one off one's stride

1. Lit. to cause one to deviate from a rhythmic stride while walking, running, or marching. A rabbit ran across the path and put me off my stride.
2. Fig. to interfere with one's normal and natural progress or rate of progress. Your startling comments put Larry off his stride for a moment. He was put off his stride by an interruption from the audience.
See also: off, one, put, stride

reach one's stride

 and hit one's stride
to do something at one's best level of ability. When I reach my stride, things will go faster, and I'll be more efficient. Now that I've hit my stride, I can work more efficiently.
See also: reach, stride

stride in(to some place)

to walk with long steps into some place. Jeff strode into the restaurant and demanded the best table. He strode in and ordered roast chicken.
See also: stride

stride out of

some place to walk with long steps out of some place. The angry customer strode out of the shop without purchasing anything. We strode out of the restaurant, pledging never to go there again.
See also: of, out, stride

take something in (one's) stride

Fig. to accept advances or setbacks as the normal course of events. She faced a serious problem, but she was able to take it in her stride. I'll just take it in stride. We were afraid that success would spoil her, but she just took it in stride.
See also: stride, take

hit your stride

to start to do something confidently and well She began writing novels in the 1930s but really only hit her stride after the war.
See also: hit, stride

take something in (your) stride

to calmly deal with something unpleasant and not let it have a bad effect on you There's plenty of work to do, but she seems to take it all in her stride. Cooper has learned to take such criticism in stride.
See also: stride, take

put somebody off their stride

  (British, American & Australian) also put somebody off their stroke (British & Australian)
to take someone's attention away from what they are doing so they are not able to do it well She was making funny faces at me, trying to put me off my stroke. When I'm playing chess, the slightest noise can put me off my stride.
See also: off, put, stride

get into your stride

  (British & Australian) also hit your stride (American & Australian)
to start to do something well and confidently because you have been doing it for enough time to become familiar with it Once I get into my stride, I'm sure I'll work much faster. She began writing novels in the 1930's but really only hit her stride after the war.
See also: get, stride

take something in your stride

  (British, American & Australian) also take something in stride (American)
to calmly and easily deal with something unpleasant or difficult and not let it affect what you are doing There's a lot of pressure at work but she seems to take it all in her stride. A certain amount of criticism comes with the job and you have to learn to take it in stride.
See put off stride
See also: stride, take

hit one's stride

1. Achieve a steady, effective pace, as in After the first few laps around the track he hit his stride. This expression comes from horse racing, stride alluding to the regular pace of the horse. [Early 1900s]
2. Attain a maximum level of competence, as in Jack didn't really hit his stride until he started college. [First half of 1900s]
See also: hit, stride

make great strides

Advance considerably, make good progress, as in He made great strides in his study of Latin. Since its earliest recorded use in 1600, this expression has taken a number of forms- make a wide stride, take strides, make rapid strides. All of them transfer a long walking step to other kinds of progress.
See also: great, make, stride

put one off one's stride

Also, put one off one's stroke. Interfere with one's progress, distract or disturb one, as in The interruption put her off her stride for a moment, and she took several seconds to resume her train of thought , or The noise of the airplanes overhead put her off her stroke, and she missed the next ball . The first term, first recorded in 1946, alludes to the regular pace of a walker or runner; the variant, first recorded in 1914, alludes to the regular strokes of a rower. Also see throw off the track.
See also: off, one, put, stride

take in stride

Accept something as a matter of course, not allow something to interrupt or disturb one's routine. For example, There were bound to be setbacks but Jack took them in stride. This idiom alludes to a horse clearing an obstacle without checking its stride. [c. 1900]
See also: stride, take

hit (one's) stride

1. To achieve a steady, effective pace.
2. To attain a maximum level of competence.
See also: hit, stride

take in stride

To cope with calmly, without interrupting one's normal routine: taking their newfound wealth in stride.
See also: stride, take
References in classic literature ?
Well, if a man can stride four and a-half feet without the smallest effort, he can't be quite in the sere and yellow.
The Prince, riding a little apart, simply ignored the hurdle, and the mare took it in her stride.
The Prince had lost ground, but he came on toward the last jump, gaining with every stride.
Strides Arcolab, an Indian drug manufacturer, has stretched out its portfolio of offerings by purchasing brands from two companies in separate transactions.
Some of the top long-striding horses of the past, like Secretariat, Nashwan, Pinza and Sea The Stars, had 25ft-plus strides but paid the price by having slower leg speed than shorter-striding horses like Mill Reef, Shergar and Brigadier Gerard.
One of the easiest drills I teach young athletes is called, "Quick Steps," which is designed to maximize an athlete's turnover by taking very short strides.
The 19 Stroller Strides moms power-walking through Oak Park Community Park's rolling hills on a recent morning regularly get together for everything from pool parties to birthday classes.
Gluing pig bristles to ant legs to lengthen their strides or trimming the insects' legs to shorten their steps distorts their judgments of distance, say researchers.
LEG POWER: Thoroughbreds are taller than most other horse breeds, Their long legs help them sprint with lengthy strides.
Try for a cadence of 85 to 90 strides per foot per minute.
provides a brief survey of the idiom followed by biographical sketches of players identified or associated with stride; Giant Strides recounts the life of a player who concluded the stride legacy.
SAN DIEGO -- Stroller Strides, the fitness franchise run by moms for moms, is launching a new business model
July 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Strides Arcolab and Oncobiologics, Inc.
At 2, she's still at least a year away from being old enough to ride her own horse in the ring with her quadriplegic mother at Strides Therapeutic Riding Center in Northridge.
A pedometer indirectly calculates distances by your stride length and how many strides you take.