stricken


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be struck dumb

To be rendered speechless or dumbfounded, as due to a great surprise or shock. We were all struck dumb by my father's announcement that he was resigning from the company.
See also: dumb, struck

strike down

1. Literally, to knock someone or something down with a heavy blow. A noun or pronoun can be used between "strike" and "down." The speeding car struck the cyclist down. A huge lightning bolt struck the cedar tree down.
2. To kill someone in tragic circumstances, typically those beyond human control. A noun or pronoun can be used between "strike" and "down." He was struck down by cancer when he was only 42 years old. Let God strike me down if I'm lying!
3. To reject, cancel, annul, invalidate, or render ineffective. A noun or pronoun can be used between "strike" and "down." The courts struck the law down, declaring it to be unconstitutional. The board of directors struck down our proposal for a new business based in Canada.
See also: down, strike

stricken in years

Old, infirm, or enfeebled. My poor grandmother, stricken in years, has to rely on us for everything from feeding to bathing.
See also: stricken, year

strike (something) into

1. To thrust, hit, kick, or knock something into something. The player struck the ball into the corner of the net. I struck my fist into his face after he made that awful remark.
2. To instill or inspire some strong feeling or emotion in someone or something. The tanks and soldiers pouring into the city struck fear into its citizens. Thinking of my poor son Jacob, who died at such a young age, still strikes grief into my heart to this day.
See also: strike

strike off

1. To depart for or begin traveling to (some place). Make sure you eat a good breakfast before you strike off! I'm striking off for New York tomorrow to attend a business meeting.
2. To cause someone to fall off (of something) by hitting, kicking, pushing, or knocking into them. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "strike" and "off." The jouster struck his opponent off his horse. He struck the lamp off the table with the baseball.
3. To split, sever, or break off something (from something else) with a forceful blow. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "strike" and "off." He struck off a piece of concrete with the swing of his hammer. They spent the day striking chunks of ice off the giant block.
See also: off, strike

strike upon (something)

1. Literally, to hit, kick, or knock someone or something on some specific location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "strike" and "upon." The child struck her dad on the head with the toy hammer.
2. To make a sudden or unexpected discovery. We've struck upon a new way to treat cancer as a result of our research into immune system modification. It appears the film studio has struck upon a winning formula with its recent blockbuster series.
3. To highlight, introduce, or raise some topic or issue. I think you've struck on an important point, Jim. The CEO struck on a number of key figures during his presentation to investors.
See also: strike, upon

strike on (something)

1. Literally, to hit, kick, or knock someone or something on some specific location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "strike" and "on." The child struck her dad on the head with the toy hammer.
2. To make a sudden or unexpected discovery. We've struck on a new way to treat cancer as a result of our research into immune system modification. It appears the film studio has struck on a winning formula with its recent blockbuster series.
3. To highlight, introduce, or raise some topic or issue. I think you've struck on an important point, Jim. The CEO struck on a number of key figures during his presentation to investors.
See also: on, strike

strike (someone or something) with (something)

1. Literally, to use some instrument to hit or smash into someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "strike" and "on." The child struck her dad with the toy hammer just like she saw in the cartoon. The driver struck the building with his car at nearly 60 miles per hour. The defendant was struck with rocks and rotting produce as he left the courtroom this afternoon.
2. To overwhelm someone or something with some sudden and powerful ailment, impairment, or emotion. Often used in passive constructions. The announcement struck us with shock and bewilderment, though those two emotions were soon replaced with anger and sadness. He's been stricken with a debilitating disease of the immune system for the last five years. The stock market was stricken with a severe downturn over the weekend following speculation of the country's exit from the customs union.
See also: strike

strike someone or something down

to knock someone or something down by striking. Max struck Lefty down with one blow. He struck down the weeds with a scythe.
See also: down, strike

strike something down

[for a court] to invalidate a ruling or law. The higher court struck the ruling of the lower court down. The court struck down the ruling.
See also: down, strike

strike something off (of) someone or something

 and strike something off
to knock something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) She accidentally struck John's hat off of him. She struck off a chunk of ice.
See also: off, strike

strike down

1. Fell with a blow or misfortune, as in The tree was struck down by lightning, or He was struck down by tuberculosis while in his twenties. [Late 1400s]
2. Render ineffective, cancel, especially in a legal context. For example, The appeals court struck down the verdict. [Late 1800s]
See also: down, strike

stricken in years

used euphemistically to describe someone old and feeble.
See also: stricken, year

be struck ˈdumb (with something)

be suddenly unable to speak (because of shock, fear, etc.): We were struck dumb at the sight of three armed soldiers in the kitchen.The witnesses were struck dumb with terror. ▶ ˈdumbstruck adj.: When I found out that I had won first prize, I was dumbstruck.
See also: dumb, struck

strike down

v.
1. To cause someone or something to fall by a blow: Boxing experts are predicting that the champion will strike down the contender in the third round. I grabbed a wrench and struck the intruder down with a blow to the head.
2. To incapacitate or kill someone. Used chiefly in the passive: Hundreds of civilians were struck down during the first week of the war. Smokers need to realize that heart disease can strike them down in the prime of their lives.
3. To render something ineffective; cancel something: The committee struck down the proposal we've worked so hard on, so we'll have to start all over again. The Supreme Court determined that the law was unconstitutional and struck it down accordingly.
See also: down, strike

strike off

v.
To start a journey or proceed in a new direction: The hikers struck off into the forest.
See also: off, strike