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against the stream

In opposition or contrary to what is generally understood, assumed, practiced, or accepted. My idea of adopting more eco-friendly habits was against the stream, but I think it will be worth it for the company in the long run.
See also: stream

go against the stream

To act or behave in opposition or contrary to what is generally understood, assumed, practiced, or accepted. I had to go against the stream to get the company to adopt more eco-friendly habits, but I think it will be worth it in the long run.
See also: stream

swim against the stream

To act or behave in opposition or contrary to what is generally understood, assumed, practiced, or accepted. I had to swim against the stream to get the company to adopt more eco-friendly habits, but I think it will be worth it in the long run.
See also: stream, swim

Don't change horses in the middle of the stream.

1. Proverb Do not try to choose or back a different political figure for an election after the decision has already been made or the position filled. Many people are dissatisfied with the senator's performance but will likely carry his party's support through to the next election—don't change horses in the middle of the stream, as the saying goes.
2. Proverb By extension, do not make major changes to a situation or course of action that is already underway. I'm really not confident in the strength of my essay, but I guess I just have to see this one through at this point. Like they say, don't change horses in the middle of the stream.
See also: change, horse, middle, of

Don't swap horses in the middle of the stream.

1. Proverb Do not try to choose or back a different political figure for an election after the decision has already been made or the position filled. Many people are dissatisfied with the senator's performance but will likely carry his party's support through to the next election—don't swap horses in the middle of the stream, as the saying goes.
2. Proverb By extension, do not make major changes to a situation or course of action that is already underway. I'm really not confident in the strength of my essay, but I guess I just have to see this one through at this point. Like they say, don't swap horses in the middle of the stream.
See also: horse, middle, of, swap

swim with the stream

To go along or agree with the prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave the same way as the majority of others. When I was in college, I used to have a lot of radical opinions and beliefs, but as I've grown older, I find myself swimming with the stream more often. I'm sorry, but I simply refuse to swim along with the stream just because it's the easier option!
See also: stream, swim

change horses in midstream

 and change horses in the middle of the stream
Fig. to make major changes in an activity that has already begun; to choose someone or something else after it is too late. (Alludes to someone trying to move from one horse to another while crossing a stream.) I'm already baking a cherry pie. I can't bake an apple pie. It's too late to change horses in the middle of the stream. The house is half-built. It's too late to hire a different architect. You can't change horses in midstream. Jane: I've written a rough draft of my research paper, but the topic doesn't interest me as much as I thought. Maybe I ought to pick a different one. Jill: Don't change horses in midstream.
See also: change, horse, midstream

change horses in the middle of the stream Go to

previous.
See also: change, horse, middle, of, stream

Cross the stream where it is shallowest.

Prov. To do things in the easiest possible way. Jill: How can I get Fred to give me permission to start this project? Jane: Cross the stream where it is shallowest. First ask Fred's boss for permission; I'm sure she'll give it to you. Then Fred will have to agree.
See also: cross, stream

stream down (on someone or something)

[for a liquid or light] to flow downward onto someone or something. The water streamed down on all of them. The light broke through the clouds and streamed down on all of them. The waterfall streamed down and soaked them all.
See also: down, stream

stream in(to something)

to flow or rush into something. The people streamed into the hall, each seeking the best possible seat. Water streamed into the room from the broken pipe. Complaints about the bawdy performance streamed in.
See also: stream

change horses in midstream, don't

Also, don't swap horses in midstream. It's unwise to alter methods or choose new leaders during a crisis, as in I don't hold with getting a new manager right now-let's not swap horses in midstream. This expression was popularized (although not originated) by Abraham Lincoln in a speech in 1864 when he discovered that the National Union League was supporting him for a second term as President.
See also: change, horse

swim against the current

Also, swim against the stream or tide . Go against prevailing opinion or thought, as in I'm voting for him even if that is swimming against the current. Shakespeare used a similar metaphor in 2 Henry IV (5:2): "You must now speak Sir John Falstaff fair, which swims against your stream." For the antonym, see swim with the tide.
See also: current, swim

on stream

In or into operation or production: a new power plant soon to go on stream.
See also: on, stream

swim against the stream

To move counter to a prevailing trend.
See also: stream, swim
References in classic literature ?
The captain was convinced, however, that the stream was too insignificant to drain so wide a valley and the adjacent mountains: he encamped, therefore, at an early hour, on its borders, that he might take the whole of the next day to reach the main river; which he presumed to flow between him and the distant range of western hills.
He swelled his stream into a torrent, and swept away the many dead whom Achilles had slain and left within his waters.
As one who would water his garden leads a stream from some fountain over his plants, and all his ground-spade in hand he clears away the dams to free the channels, and the little stones run rolling round and round with the water as it goes merrily down the bank faster than the man can follow--even so did the river keep catching up with Achilles albeit he was a fleet runner, for the gods are stronger than men.
Indeed, I congratulated myself, as I looked my last at the sign of The Singing Stream, that this had been quite in my early manner.
Your wits are keen, my son," he said; "and I see that the waters of the stream have not quenched your spirit.
Accordingly, leaving the bed of the stream at the very point where it thundered down, we began crawling along one of those sloping ledges until it carried us to within a few feet of another that inclined downwards at a still sharper angle, and upon which, by assisting each other we managed to alight in safety.
If I could free my hands," he thought, "I might throw off the noose and spring into the stream.
Toward the day's close the girl was suddenly alarmed by the shouting of the Russian from the opposite bank of the stream, and a moment later, following the direction of his gaze, she was terrified to see a ship's boat approaching from up-stream, in which, she felt assured, there could be only members of the Kincaid's missing crew--only heartless ruffians and enemies.
This stream was entirely free from dangerous reptiles, because, as I later discovered, they became immediately dormant when subjected to a much lower temperature than 70 degrees Fahrenheit.
The doctor recurred to the subject of my angling intentions, and asked his daughter if she had heard what parts of the stream at Barkingham were best for fishing in.
Stooping, he groped about with one hand, reaching down toward the surface of the water, and discovered that the bottom of the wall arched above the stream.
A Dove sitting on a tree overhanging the water plucked a leaf and let it fall into the stream close to her.
Through these the tiny stream had cut its deep and precipitous channel.
Even the narrow stream ceased its turbulent down-rush long enough to form a quiet pool.
On this course nine obstacles had been arranged: the stream, a big and solid barrier five feet high, just before the pavilion, a dry ditch, a ditch full of water, a precipitous slope, an Irish barricade (one of the most difficult obstacles, consisting of a mound fenced with brushwood, beyond which was a ditch out of sight for the horses, so that the horse had to clear both obstacles or might be killed); then two more ditches filled with water, and one dry one; and the end of the race was just facing the pavilion.
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