(redirected from streaks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

curse a blue streak

To use profane language with great rapidity and intensity. My dad cursed a blue streak after he found out I'd put a dent in his car.
See also: blue, curse, streak

swear a blue streak

To use profane language with great rapidity and intensity. My dad swore a blue streak after he found out I'd put a dent in his car.
See also: blue, streak, swear

blue streak

Something that moves very quickly and unceasingly. A: "Could you follow what Rob said?" B: "Not at all. The way he talks a blue streak, I couldn't keep up!
See also: blue, streak

cuss a blue streak

Rur. to curse a great deal. When she dropped the brick on her toe, she cussed a blue streak. Bill could cuss a blue streak by the time he was eight years old.
See also: blue, cuss, streak

have a yellow belly

 and have a yellow streak down one's back
Fig. to be cowardly. Tex has a yellow streak down his back a mile wide. He's afraid to cross the street!
See also: belly, have, yellow

like greased lightning

Rur. very fast. Once I get her tuned up, this old car will go like greased lightning. He's a fat kid, but he can run like greased lightning.
See also: grease, lightning, like

*losing streak

Fig. a series of losses [in sports, for instance]. (*Typically: be on ~; have ~; continue one's ~.) The team was on a losing streak that started nearly three years ago.
See also: losing, streak

*lucky streak

 and *streak of luck
Fig. a series of lucky wins in gambling or games. (*Typically: be on ~; have ~.) Thanks to a lucky streak, I won enough in Las Vegas to pay for the trip.
See also: lucky, streak

mean streak

Fig. a tendency for a person to do things that are mean. I think that Wally has a mean streak that no one ever saw before this incident.
See also: mean, streak

streak across something

to move across something very fast. A comet streaked across the night sky. Tom streaked across the street to get a cup of coffee.
See also: across, streak

streak of bad luck

 and string of bad luck
a series of events that are only bad luck. After a long string of bad luck, we finally got a lucky break.
See also: bad, luck, of, streak

streak of good luck

 and string of good luck
a series of fortunate events. After a series of failures, we started out on a streak of good luck.
See also: good, luck, of, streak

talk a blue streak

Fig. to talk very much and very rapidly. Billy didn't talk until he was two, and then he started talking a blue streak. I can't understand anything Bob says. He talks a blue streak, and I can't follow his thinking.
See also: blue, streak, talk

yellow streak (down someone's back)

a tendency toward cowardice. Tim's got a yellow streak down his back a mile wide. Get rid of that yellow streak. Show some courage.
See also: streak, yellow

like greased lightning

if someone does something like greased lightning, they do it very quickly I mentioned work and he was out of the room like greased lightning.
See also: grease, lightning, like

talk a blue streak

to say a lot very fast She talked a blue streak and we just had to listen.
See also: blue, streak, talk

like greased lightning

Also, like a blue streak; like the wind; like blazes. Very fast indeed, as in He climbed that ladder like greased lightning, or She kept on talking like a blue streak, or The children ran like the wind when they heard there'd be free ice cream. The likening of speed to lightning dates from the 1500s, and grease was added in the early 1800s to further accentuate the idea of haste. The first variant, blue streak, also dates from the early 1800s and alludes to something resembling lightning. The wind in the second variant has been a metaphor for swiftness since ancient Roman times. The blazes in the last variant, first recorded in 1925, alludes to fire or lightning.
See also: grease, lightning, like

talk someone's arm off

Also, talk someone's ear or head or pants off ; talk a blue streak; talk until one is blue in the face; talk the bark off a tree or the hind leg off a donkey or horse . Talk so much as to exhaust the listener, as in Whenever I run into her she talks my arm off, or Louise was so excited that she talked a blue streak, or You can talk the bark off a tree but you still won't convince me. The first four expressions imply that one is so bored by a person's loquacity that one's arm (or ear or head or pants) fall off; they date from the first half of the 1900s (also see pants off). The term like a blue streak alone simply means "very quickly," but in this idiom, first recorded in 1914, it means "continuously." The obvious hyperboles implying talk that takes the bark off a tree, first recorded in 1831, or the hind leg off a horse, from 1808, are heard less often today. Also see under blue in the face.
See also: arm, off, talk

winning streak

A series of consecutive successes, a run of good luck, as in Our son-in-law has been on a winning streak with his investments. This expression comes from gambling. [Mid-1900s]
See also: streak, winning

have a yellow streak down one’s back

tv. to be cowardly. (Have got can replace have.) wrong. If you have a yellow streak down your back, you don’t take many risks.
See also: back, down, have, streak, yellow


1. in. to move rapidly from one place to another. The train streaked into the station and came to a stop just inches from the end of the track.
2. in. to run about in a public place naked. This kid was streaking back and forth until the cops caught him.
3. tv. to grace or ornament a public place or event with a naked run. Charles streaked the baseball game, but nobody noticed him.
4. n. a naked run in a public place. (see also streaker.) There was a streak at the end of the game, but people were leaving then and didn’t see it.
5. n. an exciting time; a wild party. We had a streak at Tom’s.

talk a blue streak

tv. to talk fast or a lot. Some parrots never talk. Others talk a blue streak whenever it’s light.
See also: blue, streak, talk
References in classic literature ?
He was quite willing to satisfy our curiosity, and in a few minutes we learned that the Streak had come in after dark from San Francisco; that this was what might be called the trial trip; and that she was the property of Silas Tate, a young mining millionaire of California, whose fad was high-speed yachts.
It was our good fortune to leave the Streak when we did, for a little later one of the spy fishermen appeared.
We ran the few steps to the side of the Streak and jumped aboard.
The Streak was pulsing and vibrating and roaring like a thing alive.
He just went out like a streak and cleaned up all the little local fellows.
Littleton's loss to Lunenburg a week ago prevented the Tigers from joining the 20-win club among the top winning streaks in Central Mass football history.
In 2014, MLBAM will give fans even more ways to play and opportunities to win as they build streaks toward the now mythical goal of a 57-game hitting streak.
Since high school and college sports are our business, we like to think that we're pretty knowledgeable and informed when it comes to winning streaks and historical events.
It could be argued that shorter streaks in leagues where it's harder to reach the playoffs might be more significant.
Rocks and clumps of dust shed by the comet as it approaches the sun burn up in the planet's atmosphere, where they appear as streaks.
APPLICATION: The slice knife can generate streaks by producing streamwise vortices in flow entering the wire section of a paper machine.
Black and brown streaks and splay are among the most common ills seen in polycarbonate parts (see PT, Nov.
There is a widespread consensus that the more fatty streaks you have, and the thicker they get, the more likely they are to go on to fibrous plaques," says McGill.
Many coaches have built streaks on the collegiate and scholastic level, however, in this age of job turnover the number is decreasing.