streak

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curse a blue streak

To use profane language with great rapidity and intensity. My dad cursed a blue streak after he found out I'd put a dent in his car.
See also: blue, curse, streak

swear a blue streak

To use profane language with great rapidity and intensity. My dad swore a blue streak after he found out I'd put a dent in his car.
See also: blue, streak, swear

blue streak

Something that moves very quickly and unceasingly. A: "Could you follow what Rob said?" B: "Not at all. The way he talks a blue streak, I couldn't keep up!"
See also: blue, streak

like a streak

Very quickly. Once I saw that swarm of bees, I took off like a streak in the opposite direction.
See also: like, streak

cuss a blue streak

Rur. to curse a great deal. When she dropped the brick on her toe, she cussed a blue streak. Bill could cuss a blue streak by the time he was eight years old.
See also: blue, cuss, streak

have a yellow belly

 and have a yellow streak down one's back
Fig. to be cowardly. Tex has a yellow streak down his back a mile wide. He's afraid to cross the street!
See also: belly, have, yellow

like greased lightning

Rur. very fast. Once I get her tuned up, this old car will go like greased lightning. He's a fat kid, but he can run like greased lightning.
See also: grease, lightning, like

*losing streak

Fig. a series of losses [in sports, for instance]. (*Typically: be on ~; have ~; continue one's ~.) The team was on a losing streak that started nearly three years ago.
See also: losing, streak

*lucky streak

 and *streak of luck
Fig. a series of lucky wins in gambling or games. (*Typically: be on ~; have ~.) Thanks to a lucky streak, I won enough in Las Vegas to pay for the trip.
See also: lucky, streak

mean streak

Fig. a tendency for a person to do things that are mean. I think that Wally has a mean streak that no one ever saw before this incident.
See also: mean, streak

streak across something

to move across something very fast. A comet streaked across the night sky. Tom streaked across the street to get a cup of coffee.
See also: across, streak

streak of bad luck

 and string of bad luck
a series of events that are only bad luck. After a long string of bad luck, we finally got a lucky break.
See also: bad, luck, of, streak

streak of good luck

 and string of good luck
a series of fortunate events. After a series of failures, we started out on a streak of good luck.
See also: good, luck, of, streak

talk a blue streak

Fig. to talk very much and very rapidly. Billy didn't talk until he was two, and then he started talking a blue streak. I can't understand anything Bob says. He talks a blue streak, and I can't follow his thinking.
See also: blue, streak, talk

yellow streak (down someone's back)

a tendency toward cowardice. Tim's got a yellow streak down his back a mile wide. Get rid of that yellow streak. Show some courage.
See also: streak, yellow

like greased lightning

  (old-fashioned)
if someone does something like greased lightning, they do it very quickly I mentioned work and he was out of the room like greased lightning.
See also: grease, lightning, like

talk a blue streak

  (American)
to say a lot very fast She talked a blue streak and we just had to listen.
See also: blue, streak, talk

like greased lightning

Also, like a blue streak; like the wind; like blazes. Very fast indeed, as in He climbed that ladder like greased lightning, or She kept on talking like a blue streak, or The children ran like the wind when they heard there'd be free ice cream. The likening of speed to lightning dates from the 1500s, and grease was added in the early 1800s to further accentuate the idea of haste. The first variant, blue streak, also dates from the early 1800s and alludes to something resembling lightning. The wind in the second variant has been a metaphor for swiftness since ancient Roman times. The blazes in the last variant, first recorded in 1925, alludes to fire or lightning.
See also: grease, lightning, like

talk someone's arm off

Also, talk someone's ear or head or pants off ; talk a blue streak; talk until one is blue in the face; talk the bark off a tree or the hind leg off a donkey or horse . Talk so much as to exhaust the listener, as in Whenever I run into her she talks my arm off, or Louise was so excited that she talked a blue streak, or You can talk the bark off a tree but you still won't convince me. The first four expressions imply that one is so bored by a person's loquacity that one's arm (or ear or head or pants) fall off; they date from the first half of the 1900s (also see pants off). The term like a blue streak alone simply means "very quickly," but in this idiom, first recorded in 1914, it means "continuously." The obvious hyperboles implying talk that takes the bark off a tree, first recorded in 1831, or the hind leg off a horse, from 1808, are heard less often today. Also see under blue in the face.
See also: arm, off, talk

winning streak

A series of consecutive successes, a run of good luck, as in Our son-in-law has been on a winning streak with his investments. This expression comes from gambling. [Mid-1900s]
See also: streak, winning

have a yellow streak down one’s back

tv. to be cowardly. (Have got can replace have.) wrong. If you have a yellow streak down your back, you don’t take many risks.
See also: back, down, have, streak, yellow

streak

1. in. to move rapidly from one place to another. The train streaked into the station and came to a stop just inches from the end of the track.
2. in. to run about in a public place naked. This kid was streaking back and forth until the cops caught him.
3. tv. to grace or ornament a public place or event with a naked run. Charles streaked the baseball game, but nobody noticed him.
4. n. a naked run in a public place. (see also streaker.) There was a streak at the end of the game, but people were leaving then and didn’t see it.
5. n. an exciting time; a wild party. We had a streak at Tom’s.

talk a blue streak

tv. to talk fast or a lot. Some parrots never talk. Others talk a blue streak whenever it’s light.
See also: blue, streak, talk
References in classic literature ?
The Parvis was filled with a thick smoke, which the musketry streaked with flame.
He saw the headmaster; he walked slowly down from the schoolhouse to his own, talking to a big boy who Philip supposed was in the sixth; he was little changed, tall, cadaverous, romantic as Philip remembered him, with the same wild eyes; but the black beard was streaked with gray now and the dark, sallow face was more deeply lined.
Here I behold a dainty streaked piece of brawn, and here a fair lump of white bread.
Her face, too, was streaked with grime, and at the best she could never have been handsome, for she had the exact physical characteristics which Holmes had divined, with, in addition, a long and obstinate chin.
We just STREAKED it," was the way Charley told it afterward, and I think his description comes nearer than any I can give.
The hills, purple and arid, stood out heavily on the sky: their summits seemed to fade into a coloured tremble as of ascending vapour; their steep sides were streaked with the green of narrow ravines; at their foot lay rice-fields, plantain-patches, yellow sands.
A trio of Lancers' receivers streaked into the end zone as the strong-armed Olson threw deep.