strange

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strange bird

A rather unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of a strange bird, don't you think?
See also: bird, strange

strange duck

A rather unusual, strange, eccentric, or peculiar person. His new girlfriend is nice enough, but she's a bit of a strange duck, don't you think?
See also: duck, strange

like a cat in a strange garret

Very wary or timid. Of course he's acting like a cat in a strange garret—he's never been to the big city before!
See also: cat, like, strange

How (something) is that?

That is very (something). Adjectives commonly used in this construction include "strange," "cool," and "awesome," among others. Did you know that hummingbirds can fly backwards? How cool is that? A: "Frank spent prom night home alone playing video games. How sad is that?" B: "Actually, that sounds pretty great."
See also: how

strangely enough

Bafflingly; surprisingly; atypically. Strangely enough, it turned out that we both knew John, but had met him in two different parts of the world. He seems, strangely enough, happy that the police caught him. Their newest device is strangely enough a slight step back when it comes to performance and design.
See also: enough, strangely

be strange bedfellows

Of a pair of people, things, or groups, to be connected in a certain situation or activity but to be extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. A notorious playboy musician and an ultra-conservative media pundit may be strange bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would be strange bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but their books actually have a lot of parallels in terms of themes and constructs.
See also: bedfellow, strange

make strange bedfellows

Of a pair of people, things, or groups, to be connected in a certain situation or activity but to be extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. A notorious playboy musician and an ultra-conservative media pundit may make strange bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would make strange bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but their books actually have a lot of parallels in terms of themes and constructs.
See also: bedfellow, make, strange

feel strange

To feel uneasy or unwell. If you're feeling strange, why don't you sit down?
See also: feel, strange

keep (some kind of) hours

1. Used to describe one's pattern or schedule of being awake and asleep. Because of the huge time difference, Sam has kept really strange hours since coming back from Japan. It's important the kids start keeping regular hours when they are young, as having unpredictable bedtimes and lengths of sleep can seriously impact on their development.
2. Used to describe one's business hours. The local doctor has always kept rather irregular hours. Sometimes it just comes down to luck whether he'll be there at all on any given day.
See also: hour, keep, kind

make strange (with one)

To become shy or upset in the presence of someone else. Typically said of babies or young children. I can't believe he's not crying while you hold him—he usually makes strange with everyone! Don't make strange, go say hi to your Aunt Josephine!
See also: make, strange

Politics makes strange bedfellows.

Prov. People who would normally dislike and avoid one another will work together if they think it is politically useful to do so. Jill: I never would have thought that genteel, aristocratic candidate would pick such a rabble-rousing, rough-mannered running mate. Jane: Politics makes strange bedfellows.

strange bedfellows

A peculiar alliance or combination, as in George and Arthur really are strange bedfellows, sharing the same job but totally different in their views . Although strictly speaking bedfellows are persons who share a bed, like husband and wife, the term has been used figuratively since the late 1400s. This particular idiom may have been invented by Shakespeare in The Tempest (2:2), "Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows." Today a common extension is politics makes strange bedfellows, meaning that politicians form peculiar associations so as to win more votes. A similar term is odd couple, a pair who share either housing or a business but are very different in most ways. This term gained currency with Neil Simon's Broadway play The Odd Couple and, even more, with the motion picture (1968) and subsequent television series based on it, contrasting housemates Felix and Oscar, one meticulously neat and obsessively punctual, the other extremely messy and casual.
See also: bedfellow, strange

strange to say

Also, strangely enough. Surprisingly, curiously, unaccountably, as in Strange to say, all the boys in his class are six feet tall or taller, or I've never been to the circus, strangely enough. This idiom was first recorded in 1697 as strange to relate.
See also: say, strange

make strange

(of a baby or child) fuss or be shy in company. Canadian
1987 Alice Munro The Progress of Love Her timid-looking fat son…usually liked Violet, but today he made strange.
See also: make, strange

feel ˈstrange

not feel comfortable in a situation; have an unpleasant physical feeling: She felt strange sitting at her father’s desk.It was terribly hot and I started to feel strange.
See also: feel, strange

be/make strange ˈbedfellows

be two very different people or things that you would not expect to find together: Art and rugby may seem strange bedfellows, but the local rugby club donated £5 000 to help fund an art exhibition.
A bedfellow is a person who shares a bed with somebody else.
See also: bedfellow, make, strange

odd bird

and strange bird
n. a strange or eccentric person. Mr. Wilson certainly is an odd bird. You’re a strange bird, but you’re fun.
See also: bird, odd

strange bird

verb
See also: bird, strange
References in periodicals archive ?
Also check out our list of the top 20 strangest hotel complaints.
Thirty-one-year-old Vicky, also of Gosforth, said: "My daughter said she saw a fish baked into a cake once, I think that's the strangest thing I can think of.
What is the strangest thing you've ever seen behind the scenes on a YPC tour?
Strangest lyrics in one of our songs: Nothing poetic really, it's just words that describe when rock'n'roll is been played.
One of the founders of quantum mechanics--the most revolutionary scientific breakthrough of the 20th century--and winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1933, Dirac was once dubbed "the strangest man" by Danish physicist, Niels Bohr (1885-1962) for his combination of intellectual brilliance and eccentric personality.
The sheikh wants to be compensated for the strangest of things, including Michael's fave ice cream in the world, Haagen Daaz," the Mirror quoted an insider, as saying.
But that was definitely the strangest job I have ever had to do.
Perhaps the finest brains were distracted by trying to solve the strangest crime of all - the theft of three toilet rolls from Telford police station.
Helen asked what was the strangest thing Tim Burton had ever asked Johnny to do for a movie.
The winner of the Diagram Prize, an award which recognises the strangest book title of the year, has been named as The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification by Julian Montague.
A zoo spokesman for said: "People adopt our animals for all sorts of reasons, but this is the strangest yet.
Strangest posting: "I guess Diana Ross wearing a pile of fuchsia tulle was somewhat unexpected.
Military's Strangest Campaigns and Characters: Extraordinary But True Tales from Military History covers quite a long period of time--some two thousand years--and presents odd stories, from the Tsar who made his soldiers wear iron wigs to an officer who attended the funeral of his own leg.