References in classic literature ?
A man must have used most fiendish treachery or most savage and amazing bodily daring to have stormed such a wall in spite of an armed man.
There was a Sir Somebody Dedlock, with a battle, a sprung-mine, volumes of smoke, flashes of lightning, a town on fire, and a stormed fort, all in full action between his horse's two hind legs, showing, he supposed, how little a Dedlock made of such trifles.
I stormed and raved, and the other boys enjoyed it.
It stood on a green hill, but of a green not of this world, and it was surrounded by massive walls and bastions to be stormed by no machines or engines of man's invention, but by prayer and fasting, by contrite sighs and by mortifications of the flesh.
Well, he stormed at me, as the saying is, stormed and stormed and stormed
Therefore the King stormed and raved all by himself, walking up and down in his jewel-studded cavern and getting angrier all the time.
So it was that he neither raved nor stormed against fate, but instead waited patiently for what might next befall him, though not by any means without an eye to doing the utmost to succour himself.