stony

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fall on stony ground

To be ignored or disregarded. The phrase comes from biblical parable told by Jesus, in which seed planted in rocky soil does not grow. An email asking people to volunteer to work at the weekend conference is sure to fall on stony ground.
See also: fall, ground, on, stony

flat broke

 and flat busted
Fig. having no money at all. Sorry, I'm flat broke. Not a cent on me. You may be flat broke, but you will find a way to pay your electricity bill or you will live in the dark. Mary was flat busted, and it was two more weeks before she was due to get paid.
See also: broke, flat

flat broke

Also, stone or stony broke . Completely penniless. For example, I can't help you-I'm flat broke, or He's stone broke again. The first term dates from the mid-1800s and uses flat in the sense of "completely" or "downright." The variant dates from the late 1800s.
See also: broke, flat

fall on stony ground

BRITISH
If a warning, request or piece of advice falls on stony ground, nobody listens to it or is influenced by it. Dire warnings about the effects on public services fell on stony ground. I repeatedly asked him not to behave in this way but all my pleas fell on stony ground. Note: This expression comes from Jesus's story in the Bible (Mark 4:5-6) about a man sowing seed which falls on different kinds of ground. The seed that falls on stony ground dies because the roots cannot grow properly. In the story, the seed represents Christ's teachings and the stony ground represents the people who soon forget or ignore what He has said.
See also: fall, ground, on, stony

fall on stony ground

(of words or a suggestion) be ignored or badly received.
The reference here is to the parable of the sower recounted in both St Mark's and St Matthew's Gospels, in which some of the seed scattered by the sower fell on stony places where it withered away.
See also: fall, ground, on, stony

fall on stony ˈground

fail to produce the result or the effect that you hope for; have little success: She tried to warn him, but her words fell on stony ground.
See also: fall, ground, on, stony

flat broke

mod. having no money at all. Sorry, I’m flat broke. Not a cent on me.
See also: broke, flat
References in periodicals archive ?
For proper comparison of the measured and simulated water content of stony soils, the in-situ TDR-based water content measurements on the fine fraction of the bulk soils should include the effect of stoniness.
As (1) unknown, unknowable, and hidden, the "earth" is the incalculable "x" around which properties and characteristics accumulate, the hypothetically attribute-less subject (the hypokeimenon) that acquires characteristics as a world is opened up for it; as (2) that stoniness, shininess, heaviness, etc.
Soils in this area are 21 cm deep, dark-colored rendzic Leptosols (LPrz) with 40% stoniness and 60% rockiness.
4) In another letter, she said: "Just as the stoniness of the soil does not kill one's confidence in the fertility .
His somber and nocturnal interiors are striking in their density: a young girl seen from behind, sitting on a concrete bench, pulled from the black ink of night by the yellow light of street lamps; a family on a walk by the sea in the grayness and stoniness of falling night; a lunch scene, shot against the light, in which bodies and space melt together, saturating the image whose depth the viewer must now probe.
A phase is a variation of a series based on some factor that affects soil management, such as slope, degree of erosion, or stoniness.
Stiller is called upon to express little beyond intolerant stoniness, and co-writer Wilson's self-consciously humorous swagger is seen to more comic effect currently in "Zoolander.
Thus, some fields in zone I had the highest levels of stoniness with percentages of soil cover of 13% and 20%.
As an example, a subunit which by definition is considered fertile, when found in an area affected by salinification or by flooding, or in spite of being fertile could present problems of stoniness.
But as Schoenfeldt points out, the ideal of cold stoniness makes sense within a neo-Stoic physiological regime that is suspicious of overheated bodily states, especially those prompted by the fires of sexual desire and syphilitic infection to which the later sonnets allude: "far from indicating an inhuman dispassion, the coldness the sonnet counsels represents the victory of an unruffled reason over insurrectionary desire" (88).
It is as if she wishes to merge and become one with the stoniness that surrounds her.
1983), slope (in percentage), stoniness (in percentage), and moisture regime (Brais and Camir[acute{e}] 1992) were recorded at each site.
Stoniness decreases along the savannah-ecotone-forest gradient, while soil depth, loam content, and soil humidity all increase.
4) In soil taxonomy and soil survey, soil phase terms are surface soil texture, percentage slope, stoniness, saltiness, and erosion.
The moral aspect of this refusal is a kind of spiritual imperviousness, "the hard quality of not-being-able-to-receive; a stoniness of heart that will not brook any resistance" In the end, it is like Humpty Dumpty in Through the Looking Glass: