stick


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stick

1. n. a baseball bat. (Baseball.) He holds the stick up higher than most batters.
2. n. a pool cue. He drew the stick back slowly, sighted again, and gave the cue ball a sharp knock.
3. n. a golf club. These aren’t my sticks, and you aren’t my caddy. What’s going on around here?
4. n. the lever that controls the horizontal and vertical surfaces of the tail of an aircraft. The pilot pulled back on the stick, and the plane did nothing—being that he hadn’t even started the engine or anything. You pull back on the stick, which lowers the tail and raises the nose, and up you go.
5. n. a gearshift lever in a car. (see also stick shift.) I keep reaching for the stick in a car with automatic.
6. n. a drunkard. (Possibly from dipstick, shitstick, or swizzle-stick.) Get that stick out of here before he makes a mess.
7. n. a person’s legs. (Always plural.) He’s got good sticks under him, but he won’t use them.
8. and the sticks n. a rural or backwoods area. (Always with the in this sense and always plural.) You hear a lot about how things are in the sticks. They’re worse.

stick

to/by one's guns
To hold fast to an opinion or a set course of action.
See:
References in classic literature ?
On this day of the year, long before you were born, this heap of decay," stabbing with her crutched stick at the pile of cobwebs on the table but not touching it, "was brought here.
It was nothing, after all, but a scarecrow stuck upon two sticks.
And he left five years ago--the date is on the stick.
For the sweetest craft that slips her moorings in the Round Pond is what is called a stick-boat, because she is rather like a stick until she is in the water and you are holding the string.
He struck his stick on the stone pavement of the cell, and called out, --
But by industrious poking he got us now and again--cruel, scraping jabs with the end of the stick that raked off the hide and hair.
Pulling the stick of dynamite out from the twist of his loin cloth and glancing at the cigar to be certain it was alight, he rose to his feet with leisurely swiftness and with leisurely swiftness gained the rail.
Suppose 'm you give 'm me ten stick, all right along me," came the reply.
One Ear was uttering quick, eager whines, lunging at the length of his stick toward the darkness, and desisting now and again in order to make frantic attacks on the stick with his teeth.
She roughly forced the stick into my hand; she turned her poor shapeless shoulders to me; waiting for the blow.
It came when he was full of gin, and we, being in the same fix, just watched him shove a cap and short fuse into a stick of dynamite and stroll down toward the boat.
How his grandfather, in the early days of the great war, when there was much distress and crime in the Vale, and the magistrates had been threatened by the mob, had ridden in with a big stick in his hand, and held the petty sessions by himself.
The point was that she was to stop for nothing, but to deliver the stick in all haste.
On the table lay a piece of stick which they had broken together that morning, trying their strength.
The largest and strongest man of the number changed swiftly to the side on which he came up, and dexterously closed with him and went down with him; but not before the heavy stick had descended smartly.
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