stick


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stick

1. n. a baseball bat. (Baseball.) He holds the stick up higher than most batters.
2. n. a pool cue. He drew the stick back slowly, sighted again, and gave the cue ball a sharp knock.
3. n. a golf club. These aren’t my sticks, and you aren’t my caddy. What’s going on around here?
4. n. the lever that controls the horizontal and vertical surfaces of the tail of an aircraft. The pilot pulled back on the stick, and the plane did nothing—being that he hadn’t even started the engine or anything. You pull back on the stick, which lowers the tail and raises the nose, and up you go.
5. n. a gearshift lever in a car. (see also stick shift.) I keep reaching for the stick in a car with automatic.
6. n. a drunkard. (Possibly from dipstick, shitstick, or swizzle-stick.) Get that stick out of here before he makes a mess.
7. n. a person’s legs. (Always plural.) He’s got good sticks under him, but he won’t use them.
8. and the sticks n. a rural or backwoods area. (Always with the in this sense and always plural.) You hear a lot about how things are in the sticks. They’re worse.

stick

to/by one's guns
To hold fast to an opinion or a set course of action.
See:
References in classic literature ?
Dipping into his tobacco pocket, he thrust a loose handful of sticks into the ancient's hand and shoved the canoe adrift with no thought of how its helpless occupant would ever reach shore.
Three fives he found in all, and two sticks over; and thus, at the end of it, he possessed as definite a knowledge of the number of sticks as would be possessed by the average white man by means of the single number SEVENTEEN.
It is my experience that it is only an amiable man in this world who receives testimonials, only an unambitious one who abandons a London career for the country, and only an absent-minded one who leaves his stick and not his visiting-card after waiting an hour in your room.
Has been in the habit of carrying this stick behind his master.
I own I closed my eyes at the moment when the point of the stick first entered the quicksand.
The instant afterwards, before the stick could have been submerged more than a few inches, I was free from the hold of my own superstitious terror, and was throbbing with excitement from head to foot.
said Cornelius, preparing to defend himself with his stick.
He takes off his long-flapped coat, and stands up in a long- flapped waistcoat, which Sir Roger de Coverley might have worn when it was new, picks out a stick, and is ready for Master Joe, who loses no time, but begins his old game, whack, whack, whack, trying to break down the old man's guard by sheer strength.
From these embers the inspector disinterred the butt end of a green cheque book, which had resisted the action of the fire; the other half of the stick was found behind the door; and as this clinched his suspicions, the officer declared himself delighted.
In a little while, three others appeared at the head of the dam, bringing sticks and bushes.
When I stood up, fire-stick in one hand, dynamite stick in the other, my knees were knocking together.
He struck at me with his stick, but I caught the blow upon my little shield, and hit back.
Not while I have a stout stick to thwack your saucy bones
Of late they had quit attacking, or even showing themselves; for every time they had done so in the past the little stick had roared out its terrible message of death to some member of the tribe.
Hans takes the knife, sticks it in his sleeve, and goes home.
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