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from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem from something

[for an event] to result from something. These problems all stem from your mismanagement. Our difficulties stem from the bad weather we have been having.
See also: stem

(from) stem to stern

completely We overhauled the car from stem to stern.
Related vocabulary: from top to bottom
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of from the stem to the stern ( from the front end to the back end of a ship)
See also: stem, stern

stem from something

(slightly formal)
to result from something His fear of snakes stems from an incident in his childhood.
See also: stem

stem the tide

to stop something from increasing This law may stem the tide of pollution of our beautiful river from the factories built along its banks.
See also: stem, tide

from soup to nuts

  (American informal)
from the beginning to the end She told us everything about the trip, from soup to nuts.
See also: nuts, soup

from stem to stern

  (American)
from one end of something to the other We overhauled the car from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem the tide

to stop something bad which is happening a lot (often + of ) We have to stem the tide of emigration if our economy is to recover. Ohio State were losing 24-48 when Jackson stepped in to stem the tide.
See also: stem, tide

from soup to nuts

Also, from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern . From beginning to end, throughout, as in We went through the whole agenda, from soup to nuts, or She had to learn a whole new system from A to Z, or It rained from start to finish, or We did over the whole house from stem to stern. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and last courses of a meal, appeared in slightly different forms (such as from potage to cheese) from the 1500s on; the precise wording here dates only from the mid-1900s. The second expression alludes to the first and last letters of the Roman alphabet; see also alpha and omega. The third comes from racing and alludes to the entire course of the race; it dates from the mid-1800s. The last variant is nautical, alluding to the front or stem, and rear or stern, of a vessel.
See also: nuts, soup

stem the tide

Stop the course of a trend or tendency, as in It is not easy to stem the tide of public opinion. This idiom uses stem in the sense of "stop" or "restrain." [Mid-1800s]
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

stem from

v.
To have something as an origin or cause; have developed from something: Most prejudice stems from fear.
See also: stem

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern
References in classic literature ?
They were suspended by a small stem which seemed to grow from the exact tops of their heads to where it connected them with the body of the adult.
When all had been made to appear as it was before, one of the warriors made several cuts and scratches upon the stem of a tree which grew above the spot where the chest was buried; then they hastened on in silence past Bulan and down the river.
Again he stopped, and by this time Tarzan had run twice around the stem of a great tree with his rope, and made the end fast.
Down there," he said, "is Rosa, watching like myself, and waiting from minute to minute; down there, under Rosa's eyes, is the mysterious flower, which lives, which expands, which opens, perhaps Rosa holds in this moment the stem of the tulip between her delicate fingers.
The tulip was beautiful, splendid, magnificent; its stem was more than eighteen inches high; it rose from out of four green leaves, which were as smooth and straight as iron lance-heads; the whole of the flower was as black and shining as jet.
There was a stovepipe running through the stem, and six steps had been built leading up to the front door.
If no cruel hand pluck me from my stem, yet I must perish by an early doom.
Presently both men started from their seats in surprise: a long vine that covered half the front of the house and dangled its branches from the edge of the porch above them was visibly and audibly agitated, shaking violently in every stem and leaf.
The stem at one extremity is truncate, but at the other is terminated by a vermiform fleshy appendage.
95), a beginner may want to invest in a variety of vases, including a bottle shape to display one perfect flower, a cube style for a stylized arrangement with flowers positioned at a slant for maximum drama, and a cylinder for holding soft-stemmed flowers upright or to show off stems (such as daffodils) that have been twisted into place.
Scientists discovered this remarkable ability when they injected these so-called neural stem cells into the blood of mice whose own bone marrow had been almost completely destroyed by irradiation.
PLX-I cells posses these immune privileged characteristics without carrying the associated social stigmata of embryonic stem cells because PLX-I cells come from the placenta.
Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, may not, as previously believed, regenerate damaged tissues simply by producing youthful, multipotent cells, but may instead have a more complex, poorly understood function that calls into question the way they provide therapeutic utility, according to an editorial in the August 2005 issue (Volume 14, Number 4) of Stem Cells and Development, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
As cord blood increasingly takes front and center stage as a critical source of stem cells for transplants, it has driven the need for consistent quality standards to ensure the safety and efficacy of this life-saving therapy.
Currently, tumor stem cells have been isolated and characterized in several hematologic malignancies and some solid tumors.