stem


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from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem from something

[for an event] to result from something. These problems all stem from your mismanagement. Our difficulties stem from the bad weather we have been having.
See also: stem

(from) stem to stern

completely We overhauled the car from stem to stern.
Related vocabulary: from top to bottom
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of from the stem to the stern ( from the front end to the back end of a ship)
See also: stem, stern

stem from something

(slightly formal)
to result from something His fear of snakes stems from an incident in his childhood.
See also: stem

stem the tide

to stop something from increasing This law may stem the tide of pollution of our beautiful river from the factories built along its banks.
See also: stem, tide

from soup to nuts

  (American informal)
from the beginning to the end She told us everything about the trip, from soup to nuts.
See also: nuts, soup

from stem to stern

  (American)
from one end of something to the other We overhauled the car from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stem the tide

to stop something bad which is happening a lot (often + of ) We have to stem the tide of emigration if our economy is to recover. Ohio State were losing 24-48 when Jackson stepped in to stem the tide.
See also: stem, tide

from soup to nuts

Also, from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern . From beginning to end, throughout, as in We went through the whole agenda, from soup to nuts, or She had to learn a whole new system from A to Z, or It rained from start to finish, or We did over the whole house from stem to stern. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and last courses of a meal, appeared in slightly different forms (such as from potage to cheese) from the 1500s on; the precise wording here dates only from the mid-1900s. The second expression alludes to the first and last letters of the Roman alphabet; see also alpha and omega. The third comes from racing and alludes to the entire course of the race; it dates from the mid-1800s. The last variant is nautical, alluding to the front or stem, and rear or stern, of a vessel.
See also: nuts, soup

stem the tide

Stop the course of a trend or tendency, as in It is not easy to stem the tide of public opinion. This idiom uses stem in the sense of "stop" or "restrain." [Mid-1800s]
See also: stem, tide

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

stem from

v.
To have something as an origin or cause; have developed from something: Most prejudice stems from fear.
See also: stem

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern
References in classic literature ?
As far aloft as I could see the stems and branches and twigs were as smooth and as highly polished as the newest of American-made pianos.
And in the same way was the foliage as gay and variegated as the stems, while the blooms that clustered thick upon them may not be described in any earthly tongue, and indeed might challenge the language of the gods.
Ojo gave a jump, for he saw several broad leaves leaning toward him; but the Shaggy Man began to whistle again, and at the sound the leaves all straightened up on their stems and kept still.
The stems of the ivy which clambered upward past the window of the room were as large around as my arm.
It was a kind of glade in the forest, made by a fall; seedlings were already starting up to struggle for the vacant space; and beyond, the dense growth of stems and twining vines and splashes of fungus and flowers closed in again.
And so, leaving the remnant of these damned souls still going hither and thither and moaning, as the day grew clearer, I tied some grass about my feet and limped on across smoking ashes and among black stems, that still pulsated internally with fire, towards the hiding-place of the Time Machine.
The woods across the line were but the scarred and blackened ruins of woods; for the most part the trees had fallen, but a certain proportion still stood, dismal grey stems, with dark brown foliage instead of green.
After a time we drew near the road, and as we did so we heard the clatter of hoofs and saw through the tree stems three cavalry soldiers riding slowly towards Woking.
He talked on, therefore, at great length, while I merely leaned back in my chair with my eyes shut, and amused myself with munching raisins and filliping the stems about the room.
Upon examining it I discovered that one of the raisin stems which I had been filliping about the room during the discourse of the Angel of the Odd, had flown through the fractured crystal, and lodging, singularly enough, in the key-hole, with an end projecting outward, had thus arrested the revolution of the minute hand.
It was a beautiful evening; the last rays of the setting sun shone bright through the long stems of the trees upon the green underwood beneath, and the turtle-doves sang from the tall birches.
Beneath the trees grewsome kind of lush, wet, bushy vegetation with silver-lit leaves and stems here and there.
From his thin legs, fragile-looking as windstraws, the bones of which were sheathed in withered skin with apparently no muscle padding in between--from such frail stems sprouted the torso of a fat man.
president, Kyushu Central Hospital in Fukuoka, Japan, in conjunction with Cytori using the company's Celution(TM) System to isolate and concentrate the patients' stem and regenerative cells.
We've got to stem that tide and keep that educational capital in this country and the state of California.