steep

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it's/that's a bit steep

1. That's a bit more expensive than expected. Thirty bucks for two movie tickets and popcorn? That's a bit steep, don't you think?
2. That's rather unfair, untrue, or unreasonable. I just think it's a bit steep for her to call me lazy, when she knows I've got a medical condition keeping me from working!
See also: bit, steep

be a bit steep

1. To be a bit more expensive than expected. Thirty bucks for two movie tickets and an order of popcorn? That's a bit steep, don't you think?
2. To be unfair, untrue, or unreasonable. I just think it's a bit steep for her to call me lazy, when she knows I've got a medical condition keeping me from working!
See also: bit, steep

be rather steep

1. To be more expensive than expected. Thirty bucks for two movie tickets and an order of popcorn? That's rather steep, don't you think?
2. To be unfair, untrue, or unreasonable. I just think it's rather steep for her to call me lazy, when she knows I've got a medical condition keeping me from working!
See also: rather, steep

be steeped in (something)

To possess or display a certain characteristic. Every activity at this school is steeped in tradition.
See also: steep

steep in

1. Literally, to soak something in some substance in order to imbue something into or draw something out of it. A noun or pronoun is used between "steep" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. You can steep tea leaves in cold water and still extract the same flavor, but it works much quicker with hot water. The cloth is steeped in a special mixture of chemicals that give is a softness similar to silk.
2. To expose someone or something to or immerse them or it in a particular experience or situation in order to be saturated or imbued with some property. A noun or pronoun is used between "steep" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. My parents made an especial effort to steep my sibling and me in a wide range of cultural and educational influences from a very young age. As the leading university of our country for over 300 years, this school is steeped in history and tradition.
See also: steep

little steep

 and little pricey
Fig. relatively expensive; costing more than one wants to pay. The food here is a little pricey, but you get a lot of it.
See also: little, steep

steep someone in something

Fig. to immerse someone in some kind of knowledge or other experience; to saturate someone with some kind of experience or training. (Fig. on steep something in something.) Her parents steeped her in good literature and music. she steeped herself in the legends of her people.
See also: steep

steep something in something

to soak something in a liquid. I steeped the shirt in red dye. You have to steep these herbs in steamy hot water for five minutes.
See also: steep

be a bit/rather ˈsteep

(informal) (of a price or a request) be too much; be unreasonable: €6? That seems a bit steep for a small piece of cheese.It’s a bit steep to expect us to work longer hours for no extra money.
See also: bit, rather, steep

be ˈsteeped in something

(written) have a lot of a particular quality: This is a city steeped in history.
See also: something, steep

steep in

v.
To expose someone or something to something else in order to imbue some quality: The teacher steeped the students in classic literature. The university is steeped in tradition.
See also: steep

steep

mod. [of a price] high; expensive. Their prices are pretty steep, but their goods are of high quality.
References in periodicals archive ?
Iced tea can also be made using the traditional steeping method in which it is recommended that one quart of boiling water be used per tea bag and steeped for three to five minutes.
We have to use people steeped in the language,'' she said.
As Director of R&D and CTO, Stoffel has helped guide a transformation of the R&D portfolio from one steeped in traditional silver halide technology to one steeped in digital systems technologies.
Infusion: Tea made from hot water poured over an herb and steeped.
In Mexico and Latin America, el panteon, as a cemetery is called, might be considered by proper Bostonians to be steeped in paganism.
Couscous, steeped and fluffed with olive oil, formed a mound on a shallow platter.