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hold (someone) in good stead

Especially of a talent, ability, or experience, to prove particularly useful or beneficial to someone in the future. Janet is hoping her internship working in IT will hold her in good stead when she looks for a job after college.
See also: good, hold, stead

stand someone in good stead

[for something] to be of great use and benefit to someone. I know that my large vocabulary will always stand me in good stead at college. Any experience you can get in dealing with the public will stand you in good stead no matter what line of work you go into.
See also: good, stand, stead

in somebody's/something's stead

(slightly formal)
in the place of someone or something else We gave Mr. Neil a power of attorney to deal with the landlord in our stead while we were out of the country.
See also: stead

stand somebody in good stead

(slightly formal) also hold somebody in good stead
to be useful or helpful in the future His recommendation will stand you in good stead when you apply for a job.
See also: good, stand, stead

stand somebody in good stead

if an experience, a skill, or a qualification will stand you in good stead, it will be useful in the future She hoped that being editor of the school magazine would stand her in good stead for a career in journalism later on.
See also: good, stand, stead

in someone's shoes

Also, in someone else's shoes; in someone's place or stead . Acting for another person or experiencing something as another person might; in another's position or situation. For example, If you were in my shoes, would you ask the new secretary for a date? or In your shoes I wouldn't accept the offer, or Can you go to the theater in my place? or He was speaking in her stead. The idioms alluding to shoes, with their image of stepping into someone's shoes, date from about 1700 and are generally used in a conditional clause beginning with if. Stead, dating from the 1300s, and place, from the 1500s, are used more loosely. Also see fill someone's shoes; put someone in his or her place; take someone's place.
See also: shoe

instead of

Also, in lieu of; in place of; in someone's stead. In substitution for, rather than. For example, She wore a dress instead of slacks, or They had a soprano in lieu of a tenor, or In place of soft drinks they served fruit juice, or The chairman spoke in her stead. Instead of dates from about 1200; in lieu of, which borrows lieu, meaning "place," from French, dates from the late 1200s; in place of dates from the 1500s; and in someone's stead from the 1200s. Also see under in someone's shoes.
See also: of

stand in good stead

Be extremely useful, as in That umbrella stood me in good stead on our trip; it rained every day. [c. 1300]
See also: good, stand, stead