stark

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stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

be stark raving mad

  (British, American & Australian) also be stark staring mad (British)
to be completely crazy She looked at me as though she thought I was stark raving mad.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark naked

completely naked He walked into the room stark naked.
See also: naked, stark

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
The region's material culture reflected this starkness.
The desert is an outer place of starkness, terror, privation, and beauty; it is above all the locus of an encounter with God.
Ordinary folks, faced with starkness and violence, played many roles.
The starkness of these brief sections of "onstage" narrative violence, or perceptual rigor mortis, enable readers to perceive the contrast between these sections and the "offstage," repressed, and fragmented memories they encounter throughout the rest of Beloved.
Oak was the popular furniture wood because of its starkness.
Eager to counter the starkness of the concrete courtyard enclosed by black wooden walls, she chose bamboo in gallon cans - to add instant greenery.
Perhaps it is an atavistic need for nature that compels us to plant trees in our communities, but we also do it simply to soften the hard lines of concrete-"to blot out," writes Don Willeke, "the starkness, the irregularities, the trashiness, the jarring contrasts.
Director of Cinematography Jim Capp imbues his indoor shots with a gritty starkness that wonderfully captures Mr.
It shows the crime from different angles and in a more thought-provoking manner than it would come across in the starkness of a courtroom.
THERE'S a time for thinking, remembering and wishing, A time for longing, regretting and simply forgetting, And as you wake, yawn, and fumble with the blinds, The image fade, as dreams become shadowy signs, You start your day, cope with the problems of work, And as it wanes you yawn again, there's no more talk, Reaching your street, behind your door is darkness, Turn the key, lights and music relieves the starkness, TV, newspaper, magazine, hi-fi as company, You eat, and as midnight calls you have your bevy, Struggling to sleep while the mind is reminiscing, The time we had for ourselves, sadly now is missing, There's a time, there always is that hurts, won't go away, That time was mine.
While there is a lot of hands in air or out in front (somewhat zombie-like) this stylised chorus choreography mirrored the starkness of the designs, a simple blue wall for the Hebrews (also dressed and made up in blue and green) - redolent of the Wailing Wall - and a red wall for the Egyptians (similarly coloured red and ochre), bleachers and a large table.
While there is a lot of hands in air or out in front (somewhat zombielike) this stylised chorus choreography mirrored the starkness of the designs, a simple blue wall for the Hebrews (also dressed and made up in blue and green) - redolent of the Wailing Wall - and a red wall for the Egyptians (similarly coloured red and ochre), bleachers and a large table.
There's a starkness to her voice that's both beautiful and desolate, and it's hard not to think the Boss would agree.
I don't wish it could be Christmas every day - with no shops open, candlelight and entire families crowded into one room for weeks on end, it would quickly feel more like post-apocalypse starkness than a positive lifestyle choice.
The starkness also serves to heighten the impact of some stunning aerial effects, not least from Ariel.