stanza

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stanza

(ˈstænzə)
n. an inning in baseball or some other division of a ball game. He’s doing better than he was in the last stanza.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, we explore how different principles of metrical organization interact (a) within a particular literary work, (b) in a stanzaic form that evolves as part of a literary tradition, and (c) in a literary system viewed as a whole.
There is one rhetorical aspect of the poetry and music that I have not mentioned: the music's responsiveness to breaks in larger stanzaic units.
What is particularly interesting about this preface to the description of Alfonso is how the continuation of the description of long transmission from Merlin himself is stressed ex negativo by the stanzaic break.
Speech Lessons exhibits Montague's care for the stanza form: each poem has its own stanzaic form, which is often disrupted to great effect, as when the poem suddenly offers a surprising final impression, a change of speaker, or unforeseen burst of feeling.
THERE is no definitive stanzaic break between the first and the second sections of the poem, but the dropped line and the indentation at the beginning of the second section sets off and distinguishes a division into what appears to be two voices, even if it fails to fully separate or individualize them.
Leafing through, I noticed a number of prose poems sprinkled among the more regularly stanzaic ones, and my eye fell on some appealing titles: "Axe Blade," "Ode to the Beekeeper," "Praising the Snake.
For instance, the first monoptic shot--ten static seconds of a field of overgrown weeds before a bramble of brush--sustains the poetic charge of the previous three-minutelong polyopsis in the manner of Dorsky's stanzaic "open form.
Especially effective is the poet's use of each stanzaic transition point to repeat the suggestion (in a varied refrain) that his listener "may follow" the "quiet voice that tells / of small, secluded things," or follow "Beyond the gate / a garden opens on," or through doors to "high bookshelves in a firelit room," or, last, in the firelit room, to "the traceless works of childless men: / All printed there to read.
The musicologist Alfred Einstein describes its essence as follows: "it [the moresca] never has stanzaic form, but is rather a show piece for the entertainment of Neapolitan society and Venetian patricians.
Tolkien's efforts to work within the demanding metrical constraints of the original often cause his translation to drift from the literal sense, but his version has the advantage of showcasing the intricacy of the poem's combination of rhyme, alliteration, and concatenating stanzaic links.
The plain prose translation, which Hartley couches in an approximation of stanzaic format, is as bulky as Antony's armour, while bearing no relationship to the customary divisions of the Italian sonnet:
After the first stanza's immobilized "tracks," these etymological digressions come to structure the whole poem; "Cows" goes off on seemingly perpetual flights of poetic mobility around the immobilized cattle truck, even on transnational excursions via rhyming echoes, puns, and stanzaic leaps from Japan to the Middle East (28-38).
As David Mills explains, the story excerpted from the Gospel of Nicodemus came to the pageants of the late medieval mysteries via the "standard lections of the Church," such as the Legenda Aurea and A Stanzaic Life of Christ.
In some respects, this poem does adhere to the prescriptions of balladry (it tells an action-focused story, briskly and plainly, employing simple stanzaic and syntactic structures), but close reading shows that Trower has also heeded Pound's edict to "make it new.
Whether in its several stanzaic forms, as an early precursor of Mural, or in its undulation between elegy and praise, history and myth, absurdity and distress, this epic must be read with attention to its ubiquitous nuance, its "Ulysses / of paradox," its "Sufi [who] sneaks away from a woman" then asks, "Does the soul have buttocks and a waist and a shadow?