stanza


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Related to stanza: alliteration, repetition

stanza

(ˈstænzə)
n. an inning in baseball or some other division of a ball game. He’s doing better than he was in the last stanza.
References in classic literature ?
We have indeed picked out those stanzas from a quiet personal record of certain amorous hours of early youth in that quaint arctic land, Mr.
The fine-grained analysis of the inner dynamic of the Onegin stanza promises more than an insight into the interaction between basic constituent formal features of European postclassical verse.
The version of 'The Gypsy Laddie' (Child 200) is pretty much that published by Ramsay in The Tea-Table Miscellany; and the Johnny Armstrong' (Child 169) is from Percy's Reliques, but lacking the first stanza.
There's no need for every stanza to connect logically to the one before or after.
As an entertainment service with regular late breaking programming changes, Stanza has allowed us to keep subscribers up to date easily and effectively.
Part of the song's appeal comes from the sudden shift from Suzanne in the first stanza to Christ in the second.
5) How fitting is it, then, that the only mention of spheres in "A Litany" occurs in stanza 23?
Nihar adds that in the above Stanza 1 Line 2 of Jana Gana Mana, Tagore was referring to people with God's names from all the religions of India.
Michael, a senior lecturer in creative writing at the University of Huddersfield, organised the walk to keep alive the spirit of the Stanza Stones.
The speaker is first astonished and later, in the last stanza, vexed over the girl's "brown study" (19), which captures her lively inner life, since the expression refers to a serious reverie, thoughtful absent-mindedness, or a state of mental abstraction or musing.
Thus, the pairs of verses 7 & 8 and 11 & 12 each form a stanza.
The last stanza of that poem reads: "The darkness drops again but now I know That twenty centuries of stony sleep Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle, And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
Stanza length is also significant in Herbert's overall strategy.
The first stanza of the poem "In the Beginning" is typical of her poetry: "I collect stars / like rolling words / in the kindness of night / and the memory of wind / and a musical room / and a laughing girl / against the fray of things / in the rustle of a night and day / and a round Jerusalem moon / and longings bound in a net of time such as this.
Musically, each sung stanza concludes with a pattern of specific melodic figures as well as a distinct pause of several seconds duration signifying the end of each stanza throughout the chant.