squid


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squid

(skʍɪd)
n. an earnest student; a collegiate wimp. (Collegiate. Refers to sliminess.) This whole campus is populated by squids and nerds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results in Figure 1 show that the antioxidant activity of squid ink on broiler chickens.
Squid have often been depicted as monsters due to their strange body appearance as well as the daunting size of giant squid.
The squid will find their way onto the plates of happy diners, or will be dried in the sun to be eaten later.
But it won't be easy: Unlike fish, which show up on sonar because they have air bladders, squid are harder to find.
Zeidberg, who researches squid at the University of California, Los Angeles, said there are as many as 10 different theories about why the squid are beaching themselves, but climate change is the likely cause of their growing numbers.
Simply shake off any excess flour and deep fry it for 2 minutes in hot oil and longer and the squid will become tough.
Because of the delicate flavour, a fairly neutral oil should be used to fry squid.
If the new specimen was cut into squid rings, they would be size of tractor tyres, although they would taste like ammonia, scientists said.
Colossal squid, scientific name Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni, are estimated to grow to 46ft long and are one of the most mysterious creatures of the deep ocean.
OK, now you may think that ANIMALS OF THE OCEAN: IN PARTICULAR THE GIANT SQUID is to be a serious scientific treatise--or, given its slim appearance, that it's to be directed to younger audiences.
Squat takes the reader through a day in the life of Squid, the boy grown to adulthood, living out the consequences of a neglected, unsheltered childhood along side other street people in an abandoned, boarded-up tenement in New York City.
In the Northwest Atlantic, while gadids, flatfish, and other demersal species have been reduced because of overfishing (Link and Garrison, 2002), squid have risen in status from a mere bait fishery to one of the most economically important stocks in the region (Cadrin and Hatfield (1)).
One other item of note: Jones commands a giant squid that makes the beastie in ``20,000 Leagues Under the Sea'' look like a wee jellyfish.
Every spring the swallows return to Capistrano, and farther up the California coast, hordes of squid arrive to mate and lay eggs on the sandy seafloor off Monterey.
Last fall, word spread around the globe at lightning speed: Japanese scientists had snapped photos of the elusive giant squid swimming deep in the Pacific Ocean.