spout

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Related to spouted: spout off

gush (forth) (from someone or something)

 and gush (forth) (out of someone or something); gush (out) (from someone or something) to spout out of someone or something.
(Can be words, water, blood, vomit, etc. The optional elements cannot be transposed.) The blood gushed forth from his wound. Curses gushed forth from Sharon. Water gushed forth out of the broken pipe. The words gushed out from her mouth. The curses gushed from her mouth in torrents.

spout from something

[for a liquid] to gush from something. A plume of water vapor spouted from the blowhole of the whale. Water spouted from the top of the fountain and flowed down the sides.
See also: spout

spout off

 (about someone or something)
1. to brag or boast about someone or something. Stop spouting off about Tom. Nobody could be that good! Alice is spouting off about her new car.
2. to speak out publicly about someone or something; to reveal information publicly about someone or something. I wish you wouldn't spout off about my family affairs in public. There is no point in spouting off about this problem.
See also: off, spout

spout something out

 
1. Lit. to exude a liquid. The hose spouted the cooling water out all over the children. It spouted out cooling water.
2. Fig. to blurt something out; to speak out suddenly, revealing some important piece of information. She spouted the name of the secret agent out under the effects of the drug. She spouted out everything we wanted to know.
See also: out, spout

be up the spout

  (British informal)
to be pregnant His sister's only just turned sixteen and she's up the spout.
See also: spout, up

up the spout

  (British & Australian informal)
wasted or spoiled Pete lost his job so that meant our holiday plans went up the spout. And they refused to give me a refund so that was two hundred pounds up the spout.
See also: spout, up

spout off

v.
1. To speak continuously and tediously: I dread spending an evening with my cousins and listening to them spout off about their last vacation.
2. To utter something that is long-winded and tedious: I'd hoped for a simple answer, but the mechanic spouted off a technical explanation that confused me even more. The tour guides have to memorize the speech until they can spout it off without effort.
See also: off, spout

up the spout

Chiefly British Slang
1. Pawned.
2. In difficulty.
3. Pregnant.
See also: spout, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Luo, "Hydrodynamics and Stability of Slot-Rectangular Spouted Beds.
Grace, "Hydrodynamic Studies in a Half Slot-Rectangular Spouted Bed Column," Chem.
Rocha, "Coating of Urea with an Aqueous Polymeric Suspension in a Two-Dimensional Spouted Bed," Drying Technol 20, 685-704 (2002).
Bai, "Identification of Flow Regimes In Slot-Rectangular Spouted Beds Using Pressure Fluctuations," Can.
Grace and W Wei, "Voidage Profiles in a Slot-Rectangular Spouted Bed," Can.
The model presented here is based on probabilistic definitions of spray-to-particle contact in the coating zone of a spouted bed.
Coating Study Coating experiments were carried out as described in Coating Method Section, using a spouted bed unit with column and inlet diameters of 194 and 45 mm, respectively, filled with 2.
According to Mathur (1971), the annular voidage of a spouted bed is generally equal to that in a loosely packed bed.
A statistical model was developed to predict the evolution of coating mass distributions in a spouted bed coater.
c] diameter of the cylindrical part of a spouted bed column (m) [D.
These statistical parameters have been applied by several authors to identify regime transitions in fluidized and, more recently, spouted beds (Lee and Kim, 1988; Bi and Fan, 1992; Bi and Grace, 1995; Xu et al.
Although widely used in fluidization, spectral analysis has rarely been applied to spouted beds (Wang et al.
2004b), who applied mutual information theory in analyzing experimental data from fluidized and spouted beds, respectively.
R/S analysis, introduced by Hurst (1951) to analyze Nile River overflows, has been applied by a number of groups to characterize the hydrodynamics of fluidized and spouted bed systems (e.
Measurements of the total pressure drop in the spouted bed system as a function of gas velocity were obtained for several static bed heights for both particle diameters.