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make like a banana and split

humorous slang To depart or leave, especially at once or in a hurry. (A pun on "to split," a slang term meaning to leave or depart, and a "banana split," an ice-cream-based dessert featuring a banana halved lengthwise.) This carnival turned out to be really boring. Come on, let's make like a banana and split! A: "Where are Jeff and Sally?" B: "They needed to get home to feed the baby, so they made like a banana and split."
See also: and, banana, like, make, split

divide something fifty-fifty

 and split something fifty-fifty
to divide something into two equal parts. (The fifty means 50 percent.) Tommy and Billy divided the candy fifty-fifty. The robbers split the money fifty-fifty.
See also: divide

(It's) time to run.

 and (It's) time to move along.; (It's) time to push along.; (It's) time to push off.; (It's) time to split.
Inf. an announcement of one's desire or need to depart. (See also (I) have to shove off and (It's) time to hit the road for an illustration of other possible variations.) Andy: Time to push off. I've got to get home. Henry: See you, dude. John: It's time to split. I've got to go. Sue: Okay. See you tomorrow.
See also: run, time

(I've) got to split.

Inf. Fig. I have to leave now. (See also (I) have to shove off for other possible variations.) Jane: Look at the time! Got to split. Mary: See you later, Jane. Bill: It's getting late. I've got to split. Sue: Okay, see you tomorrow. Bill: Good night.
See also: split

split a gut

 and bust a gut 
1. Fig. Inf. to laugh very hard. He laughed until he nearly split a gut. The clown made me bust a gut laughing.
2. Fig. Inf. to work very hard. I split a gut to get this place fixed up in a week. Don't bust a gut cleaning up for me. I love things that are a bit messy.
See also: gut, split

split hairs

Fig. to quibble; to try to make petty distinctions. They don't have any serious differences. They are just splitting hairs. Don't waste time splitting hairs. Accept it the way it is.
See also: hair, split

split in something

to divide into a certain number of groups. (The something can be half, thirds, two, quarters, etc.) Lightning struck the big tree and the trunk split in half. The vase dropped and split in quarters.
See also: split

split off (from something)

to separate away from something; to sever connection with and separate from something. A large iceberg split off from the glacier and made an enormous splash. A giant chunk of ice split off and floated away.
See also: off, split

split one's sides (with laughter)

Fig. to laugh so hard that one's sides almost split. (Always an exaggeration.) The members of the audience almost split their sides with laughter. When I heard what happened to Patricia, I almost split my sides.
See also: side, split

split people up

to separate two or more people (from one another). If you two don't stop chattering, I'll have to split you up. I will have to split up that twosome in the corner.
See also: people, split, up

*split second

an instant; a tiny period of time. (*Typically: for ~; in ~.) The lightning struck, and in a split second the house burst into flames. For a split second, it looked like she would fall.
See also: second, split

split someone or something up (into something)

to divide people or things up into something, such as groups. I had to split the group up into two sectionsthere were so many who showed up. I split up the class into two discussion sections.
See also: split, up

split someone or something with someone or something

to divide someone or something with someone or a group of people. I will split the campers with you. You lead your half on the hike, and I will lead my half. Will you split your candy bar with me?
See also: split

split something between (someone and someone else)

 and split something between (something and something else)
to divide something between two people or things. The cook split the last of the pie between Jane and Carla. We have to split the copies of the reports between the two committees.
See also: split

split something into something

to divide or sever something into something. Jeff split the log into four parts. Please split this log in half so it will burn better.
See also: split

split something off (of) something

 and split something off
to sever connection with something; to separate from something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Dave split a piece of wood off the log to use for kindling. He split off a stick of wood.
See also: off, split

split the difference

to divide the difference evenly (with someone else). You want to sell for $120, and I want to buy for $100. Let's split the difference and close the deal at $110. I don't want to split the difference. I want $120.
See also: difference, split

split up (with someone)

[for someone] to separate from someone; to break up a marriage or love affair. Jeff split up with Judy. I had heard that they had split up with each other.
See also: split, up

vote a split ticket

Fig. to cast a ballot on which one's votes are divided between two or more parties. I always vote a split ticket since I detest both parties. Mary voted a split ticket for the first time in her life.
See also: split, ticket, vote

split the difference

1. to accept only part of what was originally wanted When they don't agree, she's always trying to get them to split the difference so everyone will be happy. Related vocabulary: meet somebody halfway
2. to each pay half of an amount I told the owners that we could split the difference between their price and my offer.
See also: difference, split

split hairs

to argue about very small differences or unimportant details It's splitting hairs to tell people that they cannot lie but it is all right if they exaggerate.
See also: hair, split

lickety-split

  (mainly American informal)
very quickly He drove off lickety-split down the highway.

split hairs

to argue about whether details that are not important are exactly correct 'She earns three time what I earn.' 'Actually, it's more like two and a half.' 'Oh stop splitting hairs!'
See also: hair, split

split your sides (laughing)

to laugh a lot at something We nearly split our sides laughing watching Paul trying to give the rabbit a bath.
See also: side, split

split hairs

Make trivial distinctions, quibble, as in Let's not split hairs about whose turn it is; I'll close up today and you do it tomorrow. This metaphoric idiom transfers dividing so fine an object as a single hair to other petty divisions. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: hair, split

split one's sides

Also, laugh one's head off. Be extremely amused, laugh uproariously. For example, That comedian had us splitting our sides, or Jane laughed her head off when she saw Rob's costume. The first of these hyperbolic terms dates from about 1700.
See also: side, split

split second

An instant, a fraction of a second, as in Our best swimmer came in a split second before theirs. This expression alludes to a stop watch that has two second hands, one above the other, for timing more than one athlete or intervals of a race by a single athlete. Each hand can be stopped independently of the other, so a second can be "split" when one second hand stops a fraction of a second after the other. [c. 1880]
See also: second, split

split the difference

Compromise between two close figures, divide the remainder equally. For example, You're asking $5,000 for the car and I'm offering $4,000; let's split the difference and make it $4,500 . [c. 1700]
See also: difference, split

split ticket

A ballot cast for candidates of more than one party, as in I'm registered as an Independent, and indeed I usually vote a split ticket. This idiom uses ticket in the sense of "a list of nominees for office," a usage dating from the late 1700s. Also see straight ticket.
See also: split, ticket

split off

v.
1. To separate something; detach something: The babysitter split off a piece of fruit and shared it with the child. Before putting the flowers in water, I split the stem ends off.
2. To become separated from something: The political party split off from a broader coalition. As the temperature rose, a large section of the iceberg split off.
See also: off, split

split up

v.
1. To separate someone or something, such as people or groups; disunite someone or something: Artistic differences split up the band. They've been together too long to let a little argument split them up.
2. To become divided or part company as a result of discord or disagreement: My parents split up after 20 years of marriage.
3. To divide something, as for convenience or proper ordering: They split up the remainder of the money among themselves and parted ways. We split the project up into stages.
4. To become divided or be divisible: Let's split up into teams. This poem doesn't split up into stanzas very well.
See also: split, up

I’ve got to split

sent. I have to leave now. I’ve got to split. Call my service.
See also: split

lickety-split

(lɪkɪdiˈsplɪt)
mod. very fast. They ran across the field lickety-split.

split

in. to leave. Look at the clock. Time to split.

split a gut

1. tv. to laugh very hard. He laughed until he nearly split a gut.
2. tv. to work very hard. Don’t split a gut for me. I love things that are falling apart.
See also: gut, split

split up

1. in. to separate. The two split up and went their separate ways.
2. n. an act of separating or breaking up. (Usually split-up.) Everyone was mentally prepared for the company’s split-up.
See also: split, up

split hairs

To see or make trivial distinctions; quibble.
See also: hair, split

split one's sides

To laugh heartily.
See also: side, split

split the difference

To take half of a disputed amount as a compromise.
See also: difference, split
References in periodicals archive ?
Merix Corporation (Nasdaq:MERX) announced July 31 that its board approved a 3-2 stock split to be payable on August 25, 2000.
NYSE:BUD) announced July 26 that its board approved a 2-1 stock split to be distributed on Sept.
For more information on these Stock Split email services (no charge) visit the web site located at http://www.
Darlene Nelson has spoken to thousands of Americans across the country about strategies that capitalize on companies that split their stock.
com had anticipated this announcement, having added the stock to our Split Candidate List in the last month.
Hooper Holmes, a Basking Ridge, NJ-based provider of health information, split its stock 2-for-1 in the first quarter of 2000, its third split in as many years, after running up revenues of $285 million in 1999.
The best way to prevent fruit split of orange trees is through proper irrigation.
Back in December, Cortex Pharmaceuticals, a company with a shallow coffer of capital, announced a one-for-five reverse stock split.
At the earliest, the plan could be approved by the PUC in late October, with the actual area code split set to take place Feb.
The reverse and forward stock splits will occur automatically on the effective dates, and the Company's stock record books will reflect these transactions at that time.
If the reverse/forward split is effected, Webco would likely have fewer than 300 stockholders of record.
Each week, the RON Splits Xchange delivers fresh jobs and candidate profiles posted by other RON members according to specified criteria such as industry and geography.
Nasdaq:MCHP) announced today that its board approved a 3-2 stock split to be distributed on September 26, 2000.
Corning Incorporated (NYSE:GLW) announced yesterday that its board approved a 3-1 stock split to be issued on Oct.
Nasdaq:SONS) announced today that its board approved a 3-1 stock split to be distributed on or about Oct.