splash

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make a splash

To be very successful and garner a lot of public attention. The low-budget indie movie is making a big splash with audiences worldwide. The video game franchise was canceled after its latest entry failed to make a splash.
See also: make, splash

cause a splash

To be very successful and garner a lot of public attention. The low-budget indie movie is causing a big splash with audiences worldwide. The video game franchise was canceled after its latest entry failed to cause a splash.
See also: cause, splash

create a splash

To be very successful and garner a lot of public attention. The low-budget indie movie is creating a big splash with audiences worldwide. The video game franchise was canceled after its latest entry failed to create a splash.
See also: create, splash

splash about

 and splash around 
1. to move about in a volume of a liquid, splashing. The children splashed about in the pool. They splashed around for an hour.
2. [for a liquid] to move about, splashing. The water splashed about in the bucket. It splashed around as I carried the bucket.
See also: splash

splash down

[for a space capsule] to land in the water. The capsule splashed down very close to the pickup ship.
See also: down, splash

splash on someone or something

to scatter [a liquid] on someone or something. Try to keep from splashing on anybody. Don't splash on the wall!
See also: on, splash

splash over

[for a volume of liquid] to overflow its container. A lot of the coffee splashed over before I got to the table with the cup. Don't fill it so full and it won't splash over.
See also: over, splash

splash someone or something up

to scatter a liquid onto someone or something. Don't get that stuff all over. Don't splash the place up! She splashed up the kitchen when she washed the dishes.
See also: splash, up

splash someone or something with something

to scatter or slosh someone or something with a liquid. The whales at Sea World splashed everyone in the audience with water. I splashed the side of the stove with pancake batter when I dropped the bowl.
See also: splash

splash something about

to scatter or slosh a liquid about. Please don't splash that about. It will stain anything you spill it on. Don't splash that stuff about!
See also: splash

splash something (all) over someone or something

to cause a liquid to overflow or engulf someone or something. Tony splashed water all over Nick. Who splashed milk all over the table?
See also: over, splash

splash something on(to) someone or something

to make a liquid scatter onto someone or something. Accidentally, the lab assistant splashed acid onto his arm. He splashed something on the counter.
See also: on, splash

splash down

Land in water, as in The spacecraft splashed down within a few hundred yards of the pickup point. The splash in this idiom alludes to the impact of a solid body on water. [c. 1960]
See also: down, splash

make a splash

COMMON If someone or something makes a splash, they attract a lot of attention, often by being very successful. Mrs Gorman has made quite a splash at Westminster with her outspoken views and colourful clothes. His debut single comes out in May — but has already made quite a splash in the States.
See also: make, splash

make a splash

attract a great deal of attention.
1996 Amitav Ghosh The Calcutta Chromosome This was just about the time that new sciences like bacteriology and parasitology were beginning to make a splash in Europe.
See also: make, splash

make, cause, etc. a ˈsplash

(informal) attract a lot of attention, for example in the newspapers, because you are famous: Their wedding created quite a splash in the newspapers.
See also: splash

splash down

v.
To land in water. Used of a spacecraft or missile: The spacecraft splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean.
See also: down, splash
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we found that 45% of the visors worn by surgeons/ assistants had blood splashes.
Blood splashes tended to occur more commonly during major operations compared with minor surgery, although the difference was not statistically significant.
However, several surgeons in this study refused to wear the visors on account of discomfort and fogging; this is of some concern and demonstrates a lack of appreciation of the risk of blood splashes to the eye.
However, a study looking at blood splashes on spectacles reported a number of splashes on the inside of spectacles, (12) which indicates that spectacles cannot be relied upon to provide adequate protection from blood splashes.
Other studies have found a similar incidence of ocular blood splashes in general surgeons.
In this study, the incidence of blood splashes on visors was greater during elective surgery; this is a surprising finding.