spin

(redirected from spins)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to spins: spina bifida, WEGO

take a spin (to some place)

To go for a brief, leisurely drive (to some place). Hey Noah, fancy taking a spin to the grocery store with me? Jenny just got a new car for her birthday, so I think we're going to go take a spin after school.
See also: spin, take

go for a spin (to some place)

To go for a brief, leisurely drive (to some place). Hey Noah, fancy going for a spin to the grocery store with me? Jenny just got a new car for her birthday, so I think we're going to go for a spin after school.
See also: spin

take (something) for a spin

To take a brief, leisurely ride in a vehicle, especially an automobile. Do you want to go take my dad's Corvette for a spin later? Jenny just got a new car for her birthday, so I think we're going to take if for a spin after school.
See also: spin, take

spin doctor

One who manipulates information, often by attempting to present negative news as being somehow positive. The campaign's spin doctors somehow made the candidate's poor performance in the debate look like a sign that he was the more relatable candidate.
See also: doctor, spin

be in a spin

To be worried and flummoxed about something. Mom is in a spin because she just found out that we're hosting all of our relatives for Christmas—which is three days away.
See also: spin

*for a spin

 and *for a ride; *for a drive
to take a ride in a vehicle or on a bicycle. (*Typically: go ~; go out ~; take something ~.) Let's get out our bikes and go for a spin.
See also: spin

make someone's head swim

 and make someone's head spin 
1. Fig. to make someone dizzy or disoriented. Riding the merry-go-round makes my head spin. Breathing the gas made my head swim.
2. Fig. to confuse or overwhelm someone. All these numbers make my head swim. The physics lecture made my head spin.
See also: head, make, swim

put a spin on something

to twist a report or story to one's advantage; to interpret an event to make it seem favorable or beneficial to oneself or one's cause. The mayor tried to put a positive spin on the damaging polls. The pundit's spin on the new legislation was highly critical.
See also: on, put, spin

spin a yarn

Fig. to tell a tale. Grandpa spun an unbelievable yarn for us. My uncle is always spinning yarns about his childhood.
See also: spin

spin around

 
1. to turn around to face a different direction. Jill spun around to face her accuser. Todd spun around in his chair so he could see who was talking to him.
2. to rotate, possibly a number of times. The propellers spun around and soon the old plane began to taxi down the runway. The merry-go-round spun around at a moderate speed.
See also: around, spin

spin doctor

someone who gives a twisted or deviously deceptive version of an event. (Usually in the context of manipulating the news for political reasons.) Things were going bad for the candidate, so he got himself a new spin doctor. A good spin doctor could have made the incident appear far less damaging.
See also: doctor, spin

spin off

[for something] to part and fly away from something that is spinning; [for something] to detach or break loose from something. The blade of the lawn mower spun off, but fortunately no one was injured. The rusted-on nut spun off easily after I got it loosened.
See also: off, spin

spin one's wheels

to waste time; to remain in a neutral position, neither advancing nor falling back. (Fig. on a car that is running but is not moving because its wheels are spinning in mud, etc.) I'm just spinning my wheels in this job. I need more training to get ahead. The whole project was just spinning its wheels until spring.
See also: spin, wheel

spin out

[for a vehicle] to go out of control, spinning. You nearly spun out on that last turn! Cars were spinning out all over the highway when the ice storm hit.
See also: out, spin

spin something off

 
1. Lit. [for something rotating] to release a part that flies away. The propeller spun one of its blades off and then fell apart all together. It spun off one of its blades.
2. Fig. [for a business] to divest itself of one of its subparts. The large company spun one of its smaller divisions off. It spun off a subsidiary and used the cash to pay down its debt.
3. Fig. [for an enterprise] to produce useful or profitable side effects or products. We will be able to spin off a number of additional products. The development of this product will allow us to spin off dozens of smaller, innovative products for years to come.
See also: off, spin

spin something out

to prolong something. Was there really any need to spin the whole process out so long? Why did they spin out the graduation ceremony for such a long time?
See also: out, spin

spin something out of something

 and spin something out
to remove liquid from something by spinning. The washer spun the water out of the load of clothing. The washer spun out all the water in the clothes.
See also: of, out, spin

turn (over) in one's grave

 and roll (over) in one's grave
Fig. to show enormous disfavor for something that has happened after one's death. If our late father heard you say that, he'd turn over in his grave. Please don't change the place around too much when I'm dead. I do not wish to be rolling in my grave all the time.
See also: grave, turn

spin in somebody's grave

to be shocked and upset by what someone has done Hoch said the place was like a cow pasture, which no doubt had his grandmother spinning in her grave.
Usage notes: also used in the forms turn over in someone's grave and roll over in someone's grave; used to show that if someone already dead were present, they would be upset
See also: grave, spin

spin off something

also spin something off
1. to form a separate company from parts of an existing company The company will consider spinning off its music recording and retail businesses early next year.
2. to produce something additional “Star Trek” seems capable of spinning movies and TV series off endlessly.
See also: off, spin

spin out something

also spin something out
to give the details of a story or idea LaRouche liked to spin out crazy theories all the time. We were dazzled by his ability to take a simple idea and spin it out into something amazing.
See also: out, spin

spin (your) wheels

to use a lot of effort but not get anything done For almost an hour now he had been spinning his wheels, accomplishing nothing. Seattle was spinning wheels while Texas beat New York to take a two-game lead in the division.
See also: spin, wheel

spin your wheels

to waste time doing something that is not effective For almost an hour he had been spinning his wheels on the telephone when he could have fixed the problem himself in less than hour.
See also: spin, wheel

a spin doctor

someone whose job is to make sure that the information the public receives about a particular event makes them approve of the organization they work for, usually a political party In politics, this is the age of the spin doctor and image maker.
See also: doctor, spin

be in a spin

to be very anxious and confused She's in a spin over the arrangements for the party.
See also: spin

spin somebody a line

  (british)
to try to make someone believe that something is true, often so that they will do what you want or not be angry with you He spun her a line about having to work late at the office.
See also: line, spin

spin your wheels

  (American informal)
to waste time doing things that achieve nothing (often in continuous tenses) If we're just spinning our wheels, let us know and we'll quit.
See also: spin, wheel

turn in your grave

  (British, American & Australian) also turn over/spin in your grave (American)
if you say that a dead person would turn in their grave, you mean that they would be very angry or upset about something if they knew She'd turn in her grave if she knew what he was spending his inheritance on.
See also: grave, turn

make one's head spin

Cause one to be giddy, dazed, or confused, as in The figures in this tax return make my head spin. This phrase employs spin in the sense of "rapidly gyrating," a usage applied to the brain or head since about 1800.
See also: head, make, spin

put a spin on

Give a certain meaning or interpretation to. Spin is usually modified by an adjective in this expression, as in Robert was adept at putting positive spin on weak financial reports, or This chef has put a new spin on seafood dishes. Also see spin doctor. [1980s]
See also: on, put, spin

spin a yarn

Tell a story, especially a long drawn-out or totally fanciful one, as in This author really knows how to spin a yarn, or Whenever he's late he spins some yarn about a crisis. Originally a nautical term dating from about 1800, this expression probably owes its life to the fact that it embodies a double meaning, yarn signifying both "spun fiber" and "a tale."
See also: spin

spin control

Manipulation of news, especially political news, as in The White House press secretary is a master of spin control. This idiom uses spin in the sense of "interpretation," that is, how something will be interpreted by the public (also see put a spin on). [c. 1980] Also see spin doctor.
See also: control, spin

spin doctor

An individual charged with getting others to interpret a statement or event from a particular viewpoint, as in Charlie is the governor's spin doctor. This term, born about 1980 along with spin control, uses doctor in the colloquial sense of "one who repairs something."
See also: doctor, spin

spin off

Derive or produce from something else, especially a small part from a larger whole. For example, The corporation decided to spin off the automobile parts division, or Her column was spun off from her book on this subject. The expression transfers the throwing off by centrifugal force, as in spinning, to other enterprises. [Mid-1900s]
See also: off, spin

spin one's wheels

Expend effort with no result, as in We're just spinning our wheels here while management tries to make up its mind. This idiom, with its image of a vehicle in snow or sand that spins its wheels but cannot move, dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: spin, wheel

spin out

1. Protract or prolong, as in They spun out the negotiations over a period of months. This idiom alludes to drawing out a thread by spinning. [c. 1600]
2. Rotate out of control, as in The car spun out and crashed into the store window. [Mid-1900s]
See also: out, spin

spin off

v.
To derive something, such as a company or product, from some source: The television network decided to spin a new show off from its popular comedy series. The media conglomerate spun off its entertainment division.
See also: off, spin

spin out

v.
To rotate out of control, as a skidding car leaving a roadway: The car spun out on the ice and crashed into the ditch.
See also: out, spin

spin doctor

n. someone who provides an interpretation of news or an event in a way that makes the news or event work to the advantage of the entity employing the spin doctor. (Usually in political contexts in reference to manipulating the news.) Things were going bad for the president, so he got himself a new spin doctor.
See also: doctor, spin

spin one’s wheels

tv. to waste time; to remain in a neutral position, neither advancing nor falling back. I’m just spinning my wheels in this job. I need more training to get ahead.
See also: spin, wheel

spin (one's) wheels

Informal
To expend effort with no result.
See also: spin, wheel

spin the bottle

A kissing game. A weekend party of adolescents. The living room or playroom was darkened and a bunch of girls and boys sat around a circle. A boy placed an empty cola bottle on the floor in the center of the ring and spun it. The bottle stopped, its neck pointed at a girl—whom the guy got to kiss! Then it was the girl's turn . . . Ah, for the days of such innocent kissing games as “Spin the Bottle” and “Post Office” (two groups in different rooms, each person goes to the other room and kisses members of the opposite sex), where the worst that the participants could expect was to be an embarrassing surprise visit from parents or chaperone.
See also: bottle, spin
References in periodicals archive ?
Signup offer: When players open an account they can choose 20 Wizard of Oz free spins or 50 Flip Flop free spins.
4, neutron spin manipulation for the measurement of the T-odd term is shown.
Spin torque offers a way to circumvent flaws of conventional MRAM designs, in which currents in pairs of crisscrossing wires generate magnetic fields to flip bits.
3]He spin filter functions by the absorption of one spin state while passing the other state, so no deflection or divergence is introduced into the beam.
gamma]] with respect to the neutron spin direction to be deduced as a function of incident neutron energy from the angular distribution: [[d[omega]]/[d[OMEGA]]] = [1/4[eth]] (1 + [A.
To detect the spin of a single electron, Rugar and several colleagues prepared a piece of quartz with a smattering of so-called dangling bonds.
PNC] is the parity non-conserving neutron spin rotation, [rho] and l are the density and length of the target material, respectively [2].
To see whether the predicted bias shows up in actual coin tosses, the team made movies of tossed coins and then calculated the axes of spin.
To navigate the vast content at their disposal, people spin their mouse's scroll wheel approximately 26 feet in an eight-hour day.
The quarks, in essence, spin like tops, as do the neutrons and protons themselves.
Here the Neel temperature for the Cu plane spins is plotted versus hydrostatic pressure.
To achieve pure spin flow, van Driel and his colleagues simultaneously trained pulses from two lasers--one at twice the frequency of the other--onto a semiconductor.
NYSE:A) today announced that the European Physical Society (EPS) has awarded the 2005 Agilent Europhysics Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Condensed Matter Physics to three scientists for their investigations of magnetic semiconductors and spin coherence in the solid state, which has paved the way for the emergence of spin electronics, or "spintronics.
Instead of manipulating electrons' spins with microscale magnetic fields, which tend to be weak and sluggish, researchers in California and Pennsylvania have devised a simpler, electric means of controlling the spins.
and SPINS today announced the expansion of SPINSscan Conventional, the most comprehensive information service tracking sales of natural and organic products across grocery, drug, and mass merchandise retail outlets.