spill

(redirected from spiller)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

don't cry over spilled milk

Don't be upset over something that cannot be fixed, often something minor. Don't cry over spilled milk—we already submitted the report, so we can't fix it now. Oh, honey, you just fell down and ripped your stockings. You'll be fine, don't cry over spilled milk.
See also: cry, milk, spill

cry over spilled milk

Fig. to be unhappy about what cannot be undone. (See also It's no use crying over spilled milk.) He is always crying over spilled milk. He cannot accept reality. It can't be helped. Don't cry over spilled milk.
See also: cry, milk, spill

It's no use crying over spilled milk.

 and Don't cry over spilled milk.
Prov. Do not be upset about making a mistake, since you cannot change that now. I know you don't like your new haircut, but you can't change it now. It's no use crying over spilled milk. OK, so you broke the drill I lent you. Don't cry over spilled milk.
See also: crying, milk, spill, use

spill one's guts

Sl. to tell all; to confess. I had to spill my guts about the broken window. I didn't want you to take the blame. Mary spilled her guts about the window. She confessed that she was trying to shield Bob.
See also: gut, spill

spill (out) into something

 and spill (over) into something
to be so great in number or volume as to expand into another area. The crowd spilled out into the street. The well-wishers spilled over into the neighbor's yard.
See also: spill

spill out (of something)

to scatter, flow, or drop out of something. All the rice spilled out of the box onto the floor. The rice spilled out on the floor.
See also: out, spill

spill over

 
1. [for a container] to overflow. I hope your bucket of water doesn't spill over. The milk glass spilled over because it was filled too full.
2. [for the contents of a container] to overflow. The bucket is too full. I don't know why the water doesn't spill over. The milk spilled over because you overfilled the glass.
See also: spill

spill over on(to) someone or something

[for something] to scatter, flow, or drop (out of something) onto someone or something. The bowl of milk spilled over onto the children when they jarred the table. The bowl spilled over on the floor.
See also: on, spill

spill the beans

 and spill the works
Fig. to give away a secret or a surprise. There is a surprise party for Heidi on Wednesday. Please don't spill the beans. Paul spilled the works about Heidi's party.
See also: bean, spill

take a fall

 and take a dive
to fake being knocked out in a boxing match. Wilbur wouldn't take a fall. He doesn't have it in him. The boxer took a dive in the second round and made everyone suspicious.
See also: fall, take

take a spill

to have a fall; to tip over. (Also with bad, nasty, quite, etc. Also with have.) Ann tripped on the curb and took a nasty spill. John had quite a spill when he fell off his bicycle.
See also: spill, take

spill the beans

to let secret information become known My husband was afraid to spill the beans about the cost of his purchases.
See also: bean, spill

spill your guts

to tell secret or personal information She thinks you should share such things only with your family, and not spill your guts to every stranger you see.
See also: gut, spill

spill over

to reach or influence a larger area The fighting may spill over the border and start a wider war. Layoffs in one industry often spill over into other industries.
See also: spill

spill the beans

to tell people secret information It was then that she threatened to spill the beans about her affair with the president.
See also: bean, spill

spill your guts

  (American & Australian informal)
to tell someone all about yourself, especially your problems Why do people take part in these shows and spill their guts on camera in front of a studio audience?
See also: gut, spill

shed blood

Also, spill blood. Wound or kill someone, especially violently. For example, It was a bitter fight but fortunately no blood was shed, or A great deal of blood has been spilled in this family feud. Both of these terms allude to causing blood to flow and fall on the ground. The first dates from the 1200s. The variant amplifies the verb spill, which from about 1300 to 1600 by itself meant "slay" or "kill"; it was first recorded about 1125.
See also: blood, shed

spill the beans

Disclose a secret or reveal something prematurely, as in You can count on little Carol to spill the beans about the surprise. In this colloquial expression, first recorded in 1919, spill means "divulge," a usage dating from the 1500s.
See also: bean, spill

take a fall

1. Also, take a spill. Suffer a fall, fall down, as in You took quite a fall on the ski slopes, didn't you? or Bill took a spill on the ice.
2. Be arrested or convicted, as in He's taken a fall or two and spent some years in jail. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: fall, take

spill

in. to confess. (Underworld.) The cops tried to get her to spill, but she just sat there.

spill one’s guts (to someone)

and spill one’s guts on someone
tv. to tell all; to confess; to pour one’s heart out to someone. (see also spew one’s guts (out).) I had to spill my guts to someone about the broken window.
See also: gut, spill

spill one’s guts on someone

verb
See also: gut, on, spill

spill one’s guts

verb
See also: gut, spill

spill the beans

and spill the works
tv. to give away a secret or a surprise. There is a surprise party for Heidi on Wednesday. Please don’t spill the beans. Sorry, I didn’t mean to spill the works.
See also: bean, spill

spill the works

verb
See also: spill, work

take a fall

and take a dive
1. tv. to fake being knocked out in a boxing match. The boxer took a dive in the second round and made everyone suspicious.
2. tv. to get arrested. (see also take the fall.) I didn’t wanna take a fall, but the cop left me no choice.
See also: fall, take

spill the beans

To disclose a secret.
See also: bean, spill

cry over spilled milk

To regret in vain what cannot be undone or rectified.
See also: cry, milk, spill

shed blood

1. To wound or kill in a violent manner.
2. To be wounded or killed: "For he today that sheds his blood with me / Shall be my brother" (Shakespeare).
See also: blood, shed

shed (someone's) blood

To wound someone or take someone's life, especially with violence.
See also: blood, shed
References in periodicals archive ?
Jason Spiller runs Formwurx from his Rothbury home and is crowdfunding to launch a retail printing facility and educational space
Spiller opened last year with a 169-yard rushing performance against the Jets.
This elegantly locates the principal contributions to the book, including essays by Robert Maxwell, Neil Spiller -- who scores a unique hat-trick of appearances in all three volumes, Will Alsop, James Turrell, Richard Wentworth, Henri Ciriani, Antoine Predock, Richard Sennett and Jean-Francors Lyotard, in a narrative stretching from Violletle-Duc to land art.
Look through Bodie's windows and you get a fascinating picture of how these people lived," Spiller says.
Along with colleagues at the Universities of Toronto and Verona, Italy, Spiller showed 6 years ago that substituting almonds and almond oil for other fats in a persons's diet over a 9-week period could lower both total and low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the so-called bad cholesterol.
Spiller said investors should be aware that they will not be able to "breeze in and out.
Prior to joining Origin, Spiller served as Segment Financial Officer for five years at SunGard Data Systems.
Spillers Records has opened up just 20ft from its old spot, and vinyl lovers have been given their first proper glimpse of the new premises.
Spiller Pure SkinCare Solutions a "Caring Partner" and recognized the ALPEN RAUSCH Certified Organic product line as clean, safe and beneficial for the special skin care needs of patients undergoing treatment for cancer.
of Canberra, Australia), Spiller (SGS Economics and Planning Pty Ltd.
It seems a little crazy, though, because Spiller hasn't done anything to match that lofty draft position.
MARK SPILLER, 30, of Billingham, tells us about his pet.
Terry Spiller, 45, had a drunken row with his partner and told her: "You will not see me again.
Christine's colleagues (back row, from left) Marion, Jean, Tiggy, Val and Marion Greenhaugh, (front, from left) Olwyn and Thelma, and (below from left) Marion, Alan Spiller and Thelma.
Tyson spurned a gilt-edged chance to win the game deep into the second-half when he latched on to a misplaced header by Spiller, but, with only Brown to beat, fired over the bar.