spend

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Related to spends: expends

spend like a sailor (on (shore) leave)

To spend excessively, extravagantly, or wastefully. Now don't go spending like a sailor on shore leave just because you got a bit of a tax refund from the government. The local council has been spending like sailors on this new tram project, while other existing public transport goes into disrepair. Every time my husband's paycheck comes through, he goes out to the pubs and spends like a sailor on leave!
See also: like, sailor, spend

king's ransom

A very large sum of money. I've always wanted to vacation in Hawaii, but the plane tickets cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

Don't spend it all in one place.

Prov. a phrase said after giving someone some money, especially a small amount of money. Fred: Dad, can I have a dollar? Father: Sure. Here. Don't spend it all in one place. "Here's a quarter, kid," said Tom, flipping Fred a quarter. "Don't spend it all in one place."
See also: all, one, place, spend

*king's ransom

Fig. a great deal of money. (To pay an amount as large as one might have to pay to get back a king held for ransom. *Typically: cost ~; pay ~; spend~.) I would like to buy a nice watch, but I don't want to pay a king's ransom for it. It's a lovely house. I bet it cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

spend money like it's going out of style

 and spend money like there's no tomorrow
Fig. to spend money recklessly; to spend money as if it were worthless or will soon be worthless. Extravagant? she spends money like it's going out of style! I can't control it. I spend money like there is no tomorrow.
See also: going, like, money, of, out, spend, style

spend something for something

to pay out an amount of money for something. I spent nearly forty dollars for that vase! How much did you spend for this houseif I may ask?
See also: spend

spend something on someone or something

to pay out an amount of money for the benefit of someone or something. How much did you spend on him for his birthday? I spent a lot on Mary's gift.
See also: on, spend

spend time in something

to stay in something or some place for a period of time. I spent time in Barbados when I was younger. I am afraid that you will have to spend some time in the hospital until the infection is cleared up.
See also: spend, time

spending money

cash, as opposed to money in the bank. I'm a little short of spending money at the present. Could I borrow ten dollars? I don't have any spending money either.
See also: money, spend

tax-and-spend

spending freely and taxing heavily. (Referring to a legislative body that repeatedly passes expensive new laws and keeps raising taxes to pay for the cost. Fixed order.) I hope that people do not elect another tax-and-spend Congress this time. The only thing worse than a tax-and-spend legislature is one that spends and runs up a worsening deficit.

spend a penny

  (British & Australian informal)
if you say you are going to spend a penny, you mean you are going to go to the toilet Excuse me, I must go and spend a penny.
See also: penny, spend

spend money like water

of someone spends money like water, they spend too much Carol spends money like water - no wonder she's always broke.
See also: like, money, spend, water

king's ransom

A huge sum of money, as in That handmade rug must have cost a king's ransom. This metaphoric expression originally referred to the sum required to release a king from captivity. [Late 1400s]
See also: ransom

pocket money

Also, spending money. Cash for incidental or minor expenses, as in They don't believe in giving the children pocket money without asking them to do chores, or Can I borrow a dollar? I'm out of all my spending money. The first term, dating from the early 1600s, alludes to keeping small sums in one's pocket; the second alludes to money that may be spent (as opposed to saved) and dates from the late 1500s.
See also: money, pocket

spending money

n. cash, as opposed to money in the bank. I’m a little short of spending money at the present. Could I borrow ten dollars?
See also: money, spend
References in classic literature ?
You see," she went on, "I decided to spend so much upon these horses only because I can easily sell them again.
At the end of my second year at Hampton, by the help of some money sent me by my mother and brother John, supplemented by a small gift from one of the teachers at Hampton, I was enabled to return to my home in Malden, West Virginia, to spend my vacation.
When I had gotten within a mile or so of my home I was so completely tired out that I could not walk any farther, and I went into an old, abandoned house to spend the remainder of the night.
It might well be deemed impossible, by those who have never tried it, that in twelve hours a lad can spend all of one hundred and eighty dollars for drinks.
I had shown them I could spend with the best of them.
When we grew older, what happy hours did we not spend with our books.
We spend more on almost any article of bodily aliment or ailment than on our mental aliment.
I alighted and was conducted to my solitary apartment to spend the evening as I pleased.
If on the other hand taxes are reduced while spending is increased, then the shortfall between what the government spends and what the government collects in taxes will widen.
6 billion budget deficit, their budget spends $400 million more than last year and billions of dollars that simply are not available.
If Congress spends more money in one category than the budget allows, the president can rescind spending until the target is met.
The survey reveals that the vast mover market spends significantly on move-related items during the 90-day `hot period' surrounding a move.
According to the new study, California spends $7,272 per student, far more than the official figure of $6,025.
The employee is better off charging a $50 doctor's bill to the insurance company, even if the insurer spends $20 to process it, and having the employer pay the extra $70 in a higher premium.