spectacle


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rose-coloured spectacles

An unduly idealistic, optimistic, sentimental, or wistful perspective on or about something. Primarily heard in UK. I know Sarah looks on our childhood with rose-coloured spectacles, but I can't put aside how difficult my parents' failing marriage was for all of us. Despite doing worse every quarter for the last two years, our boss keeps seeing the business through rose-coloured spectacles. You need to take off your rose-coloured spectacles for a moment and realise that there are serious problems in the world that need fixing.
See also: spectacle

rose-tinted spectacles

An unduly idealistic, optimistic, sentimental, or wistful perspective on or about something. Primarily heard in UK. I know Sarah looks on our childhood with rose-tinted spectacles, but I can't put aside how difficult my parents' failing marriage was for all of us. Despite doing worse every quarter for the last two years, our boss keeps seeing the business through rose-tinted spectacles. You need to take off your rose-tinted spectacles for a moment and realise that there are serious problems in the world that need fixing.
See also: spectacle

make a spectacle of yourself

to do something that attracts people's attention and makes you look stupid She did not scream and shout or otherwise make a spectacle of herself.
Related vocabulary: make a fool of yourself
See also: make, of, spectacle

rose-coloured glasses

  (British & Australian) also rose-colored glasses/rose-coloured spectacles (American & Australian/British)
if someone thinks about or looks at something with rose-coloured glasses, they think it is more pleasant than it really is She's nostalgic for a past that she sees through rose-colored glasses.
See also: glass

rose-tinted glasses

  (British, American & Australian) also rose-tinted spectacles (British)
if someone looks at something through rose-tinted glasses, they see only the pleasant parts of it She has always looked at life through rose-tinted glasses.
See also: glass

make a spectacle of yourself

to do something that makes you look stupid and attracts other people's attention I wasn't going to make a spectacle of myself by dancing with my grandma!
See also: make, of, spectacle
References in classic literature ?
My aunt, with one clap of her hands, and one look through her spectacles, immediately went into hysterics, for the first and only time in all my knowledge of her.
Not I, pious Master Pigsnort," said the man with the spectacles.
Especially the man with spectacles, who had sneered at all the company in turn, now twisted his visage into such an expression of ill-natured mirth, that Matthew asked him, rather peevishly, what he himself meant to do with the Great Carbuncle.
Then the green man fitted spectacles for the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman and the Lion, and even on little Toto; and all were locked fast with the key.
I suppose it is farming or nothing for you now, my dear fellow," Felix was saying, among other things, to his youngest brother, as he looked through his spectacles at the distant fields with sad austerity.
Men and women came, and some looked eagerly in and pressed their faces against the bars; others glanced carelessly at the body and turned away with a disappointed look--people, I thought, who live upon strong excitements and who attend the exhibitions of the Morgue regularly, just as other people go to see theatrical spectacles every night.
He beamed at her, and settled his spectacles on the bridge of his nose.
Dirk Stroeve took off his spectacles and wiped them.
Featherstone here looked over his spectacles at Fred, while he handed back the letter to him with a contemptuous gesture, "you don't suppose I believe a thing because Bulstrode writes it out fine, eh?
Featherstone, curtly, keeping on his spectacles, but withdrawing his hands under his wraps.
So put the spectacles on this fellow, and I'll take him to the royal palace.
But she was full of mystery about her art, in which a certain pair of magic spectacles did her essential service.
Now, the old lady was exceedingly proud of her bright eyes being so clear that she could read writing without spectacles.
With his big florid face held between his hands he continued to stare hard, while the dingy little man in spectacles coolly took a drink of beer and stood the glass mug back on the table.
Behind a desk, sat two old gentleman with powdered heads: one of whom was reading the newspaper; while the other was perusing, with the aid of a pair of tortoise-shell spectacles, a small piece of parchment which lay before him.