References in classic literature ?
So powerful seemed the minister's appeal that the people could not believe but that Hester Prynne would speak out the guilty name, or else that the guilty one himself in whatever high or lowly place he stood, would be drawn forth by an inward and inevitable necessity, and compelled to ascend the scaffold.
She had let Norah go and speak those words of tender remonstrance, which she should first have spoken herself.
I speak plain, sir, but I can't speak any other way.
Hear me," he said, "Trojans, Dardanians, and allies, that I may speak even as I am minded.
She was speaking only as she had been used to hear others speak, as she imagined everybody else would speak.
He was a most eager student, and in two more days had mastered so much French that he could speak little sentences such as: "That is a tree," "this is grass," "I am hungry," and the like, but D'Arnot found that it was difficult to teach him the French construction upon a foundation of English.
The prince gazed into his face with pleasure, but still seemed to have no power to speak.
I knew that the audience would be largely composed of the most influential class of white men and women, and that it would be a rare opportunity for me to let them know what we were trying to do at Tuskegee, as well as to speak to them about the relations of the races.
He could not imagine how he could speak to her now.
Well, Harriet, if I am to speak my mind," said Mrs.
It was also of some importance that I should speak to her while she was sober enough to understand what I meant in a general way.
The one chance of getting any information that I can see," he proceeded, "is to speak to Mr.
I am grieved to distress you, but for your sake I must speak plainly.
I had, so to speak, pronounced my own sentence of banishment.
Ask her the question: What was there to love in a man who can speak to you as that man has spoken, who can treat you as that man is treating you now?