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home, James (, and don't spare the horses)

A humorous directive for a driver to take one home directly and without delay. Thank goodness you finally came to pick me up. Home, James, and don't spare the horses! You know, shouting "home, James" every time you get in the car is starting to get a little tiresome.
See also: and, spare

spare (someone's) blushes

To keep from making someone feel embarrassed or awkward. However, due to your family's great service to the crown, we will spare your blushes and not create a public scandal around this debacle. I tried sparing her blushes when she asked me to prom by saying I had no intention of going with anyone.
See also: blush, spare

spare tyre

1. A layer of excess fat around one's midsection. Primarily heard in UK. I think I need to lay off the lager, because this spare tyre of mine is getting a bit out of hand.
2. An unhelpful, unnecessary, unproductive, or unwanted person in a group. Primarily heard in UK. There are a few spare tyres on this project who are really holding back our progress. Ever since John's girlfriend started hanging out with us, it's left me feeling like a spare tyre.
See also: spare, tyre

and something to spare

 and with something to spare
Fig. with extra left over; with more than is needed. I had as much flour as I needed with some to spare. Fred said he should have enough cash to last the week—with money to spare.
See also: and, spare

enough and some to spare

Fig. plenty. Would you like some more pie? We've got enough and some to spare. Mary: Can I borrow a cup of milk? Tom: Don't worry about borrowing. Take it. I have enough and some to spare.
See also: and, enough, spare

have something to spare

Fig. to have more than enough of something. Ask John for some firewood. He has firewood to spare. Do you have any candy to spare?
See also: have, spare

in one's spare time

in one's extra time; in the time not reserved for work or doing something else. I write novels in my spare time. I'll try to paint the house in my spare time.
See also: spare, time

not a moment to spare

 and without a moment to spare
just in time; with no extra time. Hurry, hurry! There's not a moment to spare! I arrived without a moment to spare.
See also: moment, not, spare

spare someone something

to exempt someone from having to listen to or experience something. I'll spare you the details and get to the point. Please, spare me the story and tell me what you want.

spare the rod and spoil the child.

Prov. You should punish a child when he or she misbehaves, because if you do not, the child will grow up expecting everyone to indulge him or her. Jane: How can you allow your little boy to be so rude? Ellen: It distresses me to punish him. Jane: lean understand that, but spare the rod and spoil the child.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

spare tire

1. a thickness in the waist; a roll of fat around one's waist. I've got to get rid of this spare tire. The spare tire started when I was twenty-six.
2. an unneeded person; an unproductive person. Gary is a spare tire. Send him home. You spare tires over there! Get to work.
See also: spare, tire

spare no effort to do something

to work as hard as possible to achieve something Emergency services have spared no effort to help people whose homes were destroyed by the tornadoes.
Related vocabulary: spare no expense
See also: effort, spare

spare no expense

to not consider the cost of something The team spared no expense in hiring players last year.
Related vocabulary: spare no effort to do something
See also: expense, spare

have something to spare

to have something available to use I'm doing a survey and I wonder if you have five minutes to spare.
See also: have, spare

save/spare somebody's blushes

  (British & Australian)
to do something to prevent someone feeling embarrassed Granger saved the team's blushes by scoring the only goal in the last five minutes of the game. The audience's blushes were spared because the censors had removed all the explicit sex scenes from the film.
See also: blush, save

no expense is spared

if no expense is spared in arranging something, a lot of money is spent to make it extremely good No expense was spared in making the guests feel comfortable.
See and hang the cost
See also: expense, spare

be going spare

  (British & Australian)
if something is going spare, you can have it because no one else wants it 'Do you want some more cheesecake?' 'Yes, if it's going spare.'
See also: going, spare

be like a spare prick at a wedding

  (British taboo, humorous)
to feel silly because you are present at an event but no one needs you and no one is talking to you Everyone else there had come with their partners and I was left feeling like a spare prick at a wedding.
See also: like, prick, spare, wedding

Don't spare the horses.

  (Australian informal)
something that you say to someone in order to tell them to hurry Go and buy some milk and don't spare the horses.
See also: horse, spare

go spare

  (British & Australian informal)
to become very angry She'd go spare if she found out he was spending all that money.
See save blushes
See also: spare

spare the rod and spoil the child

Discipline is necessary for good upbringing, as in She lets Richard get away with anything-spare the rod, you know. This adage appears in the Bible (Proverbs 13:24) and made its way into practically every proverb collection. It originally referred to corporal punishment. It is still quoted, often in shortened form, and today does not necessarily mean physical discipline.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

spare tire

Fat around one's middle, as in He's determined to lose ten pounds and that spare tire he's acquired. This expression transfers the term for an extra tire carried in cars in case of a flat tire to excess fat around the waist. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: spare, tire

to spare

In addition to what is needed, extra, left over, as in We paid our bills and still had money to spare. This expression uses spare in the sense of "leftover" or "unused," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: spare

spare tire

1. n. a thickness in the waist; a roll of fat around one’s waist. The spare tire started when I was twenty-six.
2. n. an unneeded person; an unproductive person. Gary is a spare tire. Send him home.
See also: spare, tire

to spare

In addition to what is needed: We paid our bills and had money to spare.
See also: spare
References in periodicals archive ?
The agreement called for the Sparers to prepare a master plan for the development of the rest of the land.
We're in the midst of putting in plans,'' Joseph Sparer said.
Palmdale will credit the Sparers for jobs created and streets and water and sewer lines built on the site.
Rae eschews the denser feel of her earlier work for sparer, emptier compositions - in general, an improvement.
According to Cynthia Sparer, Executive Director of Children's Hospital of New York at NewYork-Presbyterian, the project began in April 1999 with the dedication of the Morgan Stanley Dean Witter Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, for which the firm had contributed $3.
Michael Sparer, PhD, JD, Department Chair, Health Policy and
In these collections, Stanford's portrayals of violence differ from the fevered, densely mythic architectures of his early books, evolving into a sparer, distilled narrative approach that often focuses on domestic crises between lovers rather than boyhood pals on wilderness adventures.
The regulation has its roots in a 1948 incident in which pickle packers Sidney Sparer and Moses Dexler were arrested for selling rotten pickles "unfit for human consumption," according to the Connecticut State Library.
But such is the risk which this kind of poetry, sparer than that of Thomas Hardy and others, seems not only willing but destined to take.
Graver does not mention Beckett but Sara Jane Bailes argues in Performance Theatre and the Poetics of Failure (London: Routledge, 2011) that Forced Entertainment s expert impersonations of inept actors share with Beckett an "interrogatfion]" of the "way in which written text can be made to function differently in drama" (67) but this claim misses the sharp divergence between Beckett's via negativa, his quest for ever sparer texts and emptier stages, and Forced Entertainments displays of the clutter and excess of amateur performances.
Article II, Section 2, is sparer still, merely granting the president power to (1) serve as commander in chief, (2) appoint ambassadors, and (3) make treaties with the advice and consent of the Senate.
Film audiences of the fifties, however, were accustomed to sparer representations of sexuality than book audiences.
Elms's floor seemed sparer than the other two, until I realized that big-ticket items on other floors, such as Zoe Leonard's camera obscura and a sprawling My Barbarian installation, were part of Elms's selection but were allowed to behave as if they weren't.
Thanks also to Henry Monaghan, Judith Resnik, Ernie Young, Bruce Ackerman, Jon Michaels, the editors of the Yale Law Journal, my co-contributors to this Feature, and Katie Hall, Michael Sparer and the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, for providing peaceful office space.
Sparer, Safety Net Providers and the New Medicaid: Choices and Challenges, in Medicaid and Devolution: A View from the States 154, 156-66 (Frank J.