spam

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spam

1. n. something disliked, typically, but not necessarily, food. (From the brand name of a canned meat product.) I can’t eat this “spam.” It could be spoiled.
2. n. one or a series of uninvited email messages advertising money-making schemes, pornography, or sales of any kind. If I don’t recognize the sender, I assume the message is spam and I delete it.
3. tv. to clutter or fill someone’s email account with spam (sense 2). Some jerk is spamming me with an advertisement for dirty pictures.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the use of blackhole lists increased, many spammers switched to "zombie machines" (computers that have been taken over by a hacker, often through a trojan infection) so that the origin of the spam was not on a blackhole list.
Italy has enacted tough anti-spam legislation which can land persistent spammers in jail for up to three years with heavy fines, and Australia is introducing tough legislation which bans marketing of e-mail address lists and fines spammers up to $1.
Spammers steal other people's resources: bandwidth, server capacity, whois databases, netadmin time, time spent deleting.
Spammers must also include a working opt-out mechanism for 30 days after the transmission of the spam.
When notorious spammer Alan Ralsky boasted about his brand new $740,000 home in the pages of his local newspaper, he probably did not expect to be tracked down and given a taste of his own medicine.
Not satisfied with using the e-mail and Messenger systems, spammers are also sending text solicitations to cell phones and faxes, neither of which utilities, I am happy to say, I use.
That will attract attention and force the industry to better protect its systems while making it nearly impossible for spammers to find a safe haven.
According to a report by Blue Security, spammers and phishers are using so-called "registration attacks" and "password reminder attacks" to build wide-ranging profiles of online users.
LashBack also uses the information it gathers on the illegal activities of spammers to work with the Federal Trade Commission and anti-spam organizations worldwide to find and punish spammers for their criminal activities.
Those ever-crafty spammers have found new ways into the e-mail accounts of the world.
These techniques are not very useful against the modern spammer since their email addresses, subject lines and message content are constantly changing.
Lawrence Lessig, a Stanford law professor and the author of Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, believes the problem is enforcement, and his proposal is for the government to pay a bounty to any geek who can track down and identify a spammer.
Experts preach some important dos and don'ts when it comes to dealing with spam that is driving you nuts: assume mall from any unknown sender is spam, choose an ISP with a stated anti-spam policy, do not threaten spammers by return e-mail, do not "unsubscribe" from a spammer's list (this tells them your address is a good one and you will probably just get more spam), use a good anti-spam program, be careful when you, give your e-mail address to a listserve system (eBay is probably okay, Fred's GetRichQuick probably is not) and finally, disguise your email address if you make postings to newsgroups.
Youngblood and her team determined that the spam originated from a single spammer or group of spammers, and in August 2003, EarthLink filed a lawsuit against "John Does" 1 - 25, aka the Alabama Spammers.
And, most notably, it reveals the identity of the spammer.