space

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breathing space

1. A sufficient buffer of time or space that allows for freedom of movement or relief from a given source of pressure or stress. My yearly bonus always affords us a little bit of breathing space for the Christmas expenses. Please move back and give us some of breathing space here. The professor extended the deadline for our midterm papers, so I've got a bit of breathing space to get it finished.
2. A pause to rest or to think over something. Give me a minute, I just need a little breathing space while I figure this out.
See also: breathing, space

free space

In physics, an area of space that has no gravitational or electromagnetic fields. I totally failed that physics test on free space.
See also: free, space

space cadet

A person considered out of touch with reality. I tried having a serious conversation with her, but she's such a space cadet that I gave up after a few minutes of hearing her ramble on about my aura.
See also: cadet, space

space out

to become giddy or disoriented. Judy spaced out during the meeting and I didn't understand a word she said. I have a tendency to space out at the end of a hard day.
See also: out, space

space someone out

to cause someone to become giddy. The circus clowns just spaced me out. The hilarious spectacle spaced out the entire audience.
See also: out, space

take up space

 and take up room
to fill or occupy space. (Note the variations in the examples.) The piano is taking up too much room in our living room. John, you're not being any help at all. You're just taking up space.
See also: space, take, up

waste of space

something that is completely without value. The wrecked furniture in here is just a waste of space. This broken-down car is a waste of space!
See also: of, space, waste

a space cadet

  (humorous)
a strange or crazy person I wouldn't trust him with the children - he's a real space cadet.
See Watch this space
See also: cadet, space

be a waste of space

  (informal)
if you say that someone is a waste of space, you mean that they do not do anything useful and you do not like them Her husband's a complete waste of space.
See also: of, space, waste

Watch this space.

something that you say which means that you think there will soon be exciting changes in a situation I have plans for my career. Watch this space.
See also: space, this, watch

breathing space

1. Room or time in which to breathe, as in In that crowded hall, there was hardly any breathing space. Previously this term was put as breathing room. [Mid-1600s]
2. A rest or pause. For example, I can't work at this all day; I need some breathing space. This usage replaced the earlier breathing while. [Mid-1600s]
See also: breathing, space

space out

Stupefy or disorient, as if or from a drug. For example, This medication spaces me out so I can't think clearly, or I wonder what those kids are on-they look totally spaced out. [1960s] Also see zone out.
See also: out, space

take up space

Also, take up room or time . See take up, def. 6.
See also: space, take, up

space out

v.
1. To organize or arrange some things or some people with spaces between: The tournament organizers spaced the matches out so that players would have time to rest. The police officers spaced themselves out along the parade route.
2. To stupefy or disorient someone from or as if from a drug: The medicine spaces me out so I can't think clearly. The summer heat tends to space out the students and makes it difficult to teach.
3. To lose awareness of one's surroundings: I stared out the window and spaced out for an hour.
4. To lose concentration or become inattentive: I was supposed to meet her at 9:00, but I spaced out and didn't get there till 10:30.
See also: out, space

space cadet

1. n. a person who is always silly or giddy. Here comes a space cadet who looks like he has more money than he needs.
2. n. a person who is always high on drugs. The space cadets can usually be found sitting on a bench outside the principal’s office.
See also: cadet, space

space out

1. n. a giddy person. (Usually space-out.) Terry is becoming such a space-out!
2. and space in. to become giddy; to become disoriented. She is spacing again. She doesn’t even know where she is.
See also: out, space

space

verb

space someone out

tv. to cause someone to become giddy. The whole business just spaced me out.
See also: out, space
References in classic literature ?
But now each of his three shots, though well placed in triangular fashion around the rim of the bull's-eye, yet allowed an easy space for Allan to graze within.
The time of Elizabeth was only distant from the present time by a moment of space compared with the ages which had passed since the water had run between those banks, and the green thickets swarmed there, and the small trees had grown to huge wrinkled trees in solitude.
I have no space (in that little room) to catalogue all the whim-whams with which she had made it beautiful, from the hand-sewn bell-rope which pulled no bell to the hand-painted cigar-box that contained no cigars.
Dwar: 3 feathers; 3 spaces straight in any direction or combination.
To the Boy:) Tell me, boy, do you assert that a double space comes from a double line?
Westward of the shores of America, a wide space of open ocean extends, with not an island as a halting-place for emigrants; here we have a barrier of another kind, and as soon as this is passed we meet in the eastern islands of the Pacific, with another and totally distinct fauna.
Throughout the spaces interspersed with atolls, where not a single peak of high land has been left above the level of the sea, the sinking must have been immense in amount.
I stopped just in time to prevent myself emerging upon an open space.
That Space, as our mathematicians have it, is spoken of as having three dimensions, which one may call Length, Breadth, and Thickness, and is always definable by reference to three planes, each at right angles to the others.
The Tasmanians, in spite of their human likeness, were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immi- grants, in the space of fifty years.
It lingered but a moment's space, that dream of Spring, and died; Yet as my head the pillows pressed, my soul had found thy side.
Space, likewise, is a continuous quantity; for the parts of a solid occupy a certain space, and these have a common boundary; it follows that the parts of space also, which are occupied by the parts of the solid, have the same common boundary as the parts of the solid.
He pointed to a vacant space of greenish sea, where there were no dories.
I must have been giddy, and perhaps we both were giddy, but the next thing I knew there was a good foot of space between us in the peaceful glow of the ground- glass globes, in the everlasting stillness of the winged figures.
A few clouds tempered the heat of the day, and, besides, a little air could be felt over this vast expanse of water; but about one o'clock, the Victoria, having slanted across this part of the lake, again advanced over the land for a space of seven or eight miles.