References in classic literature ?
He really did look serious when he was saying it, and I couldn't help feeling a sort of exultation that he was number Two in one day.
And that's the sort of fact that impresses your political man, especially if the lady is, well, such as she is .
Presently, a sort of choking sound came out of the pillow, and went straight to her heart the most pathetic sob she ever heard, for, though it was the most natural means of relief, the poor fellow must not indulge in it because of the afflicted eyes.
Then we shall be right in getting rid of the lamentations of famous men, and making them over to women (and not even to women who are good for anything), or to men of a baser sort, that those who are being educated by us to be the defenders of their country may scorn to do the like.
Fentolin has been making a sort of hobby of the place.
It is not easy to state precisely wherein the difference between these two sorts of knowledge consists, but it is easy to feel the difference.
This horrid aspersion (I regret I am no longer exposed to that sort of insult) made me huffy too.
He did not conceal either of these sentiments from his empanelled countrymen, and that sort of compunction appeared shockingly imperfect to the crammed court.
But yet I am firmly persuaded that a great deal of consciousness, every sort of consciousness, in fact, is a disease.
But what sort of an abode have I lighted upon, Barbara Alexievna?
While the stars that oversprinkle All the heavens, seem to twinkle With a crystalline delight; Keeping time, time, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells From the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells - From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells.
I don't love niggers any more than you do," she replied, "and I suppose one mustn't be too particular where that sort of cleaning up is concerned.
Harold March was the sort of man who knows everything about politics, and nothing about politicians.
He sort of made you feel that all men are born equal, but that it was awful good of him to be talking to you, and that he wouldn't do it for everybody.
Casaubon was out of the question, not merely because he declined duty of this sort, but because Featherstone had an especial dislike to him as the rector of his own parish, who had a lien on the land in the shape of tithe, also as the deliverer of morning sermons, which the old man, being in his pew and not at all sleepy, had been obliged to sit through with an inward snarl.