sorrow

(redirected from sorrows)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to sorrows: Man of Sorrows

drown one's troubles

 and drown one's sorrows
Fig. to try to forget one's problems by drinking a lot of alcohol. Bill is in the bar, drowning his troubles. Jane is at home, drowning her sorrows.
See also: drown, trouble

share someone's sorrow

to grieve as someone else grieves. We all share your sorrow on this sad, sad day. I am sorry to hear about the death in your family. I share your sorrow.
See also: share, sorrow

sorrow over someone or something

to grieve or feel sad about someone or something. There is no need to sorrow over Tom. He will come back. He is sorrowing over the business he has lost because of the weather.
See also: sorrow

drown your sorrows

to drink a lot of alcohol because you want to stop feeling sad Frank insisted that I accompany him to his house, where I could drown my sorrows.
Usage notes: sometimes said about eating or drinking something other than alcohol: I decided I'd drown my sorrows in a bucket of chocolate ice cream.
See also: drown, sorrow

drown your sorrows

to drink a lot of alcohol because you want to stop feeling sad I've got a bottle of whiskey here - shall we stay in and drown our sorrows?
See also: drown, sorrow

drown one's sorrows

Drink liquor to escape one's unhappiness. For example, After the divorce, she took to drowning her sorrows at the local bar. The notion of drowning in drink dates from the late 1300s.
See also: drown, sorrow

more in sorrow than in anger

Saddened rather than infuriated by someone's behavior. For example, When Dad learned that Jack had stolen a car, he looked at him more in sorrow than in anger . This expression first appeared in 1603 in Shakespeare's Hamlet (1:2), where Horatio describes to Hamlet the appearance of his father's ghost: "A countenance more in sorrow than in anger."
See also: anger, more, sorrow

drown (one's) sorrow

/sorrows
To try to forget one's troubles by drinking alcohol.
See also: drown, sorrow
References in classic literature ?
A month of fever could not have changed her more than this one night of sleeplessness and sorrow.
This is, indeed, a house of mourning," said Valentine; "speak, Maximilian, although the cup of sorrow seems already full.
Dear children, let us not tire of a good work, hard though it be and wearisome; think of the many little hearts that in their sorrow look to us for help.
His face, unwashed since yesterday, looked pallid and clammy; his hair was tossed shaggily about his forehead, and his closed eyes had the sunken look which follows upon watching and sorrow.
The bondswomen whom Achilles and Patroclus had taken captive screamed aloud for grief, beating their breasts, and with their limbs failing them for sorrow.
Back to the spot where he had left Werper went the ape-man, joy in his heart now, where fear and sorrow had so recently reigned; and in his mind a determination to forgive the Belgian and aid him in making good his escape.
I think, if ever any great sorrow came to me, I would come to the pines for comfort," said Anne dreamily.
He foretold that great sorrow and evil should come upon the land because of this child, and so he called her Deirdre, which means trouble or alarm.
We may state the question thus:--Imitation imitates the actions of men, whether voluntary or involuntary, on which, as they imagine, a good or bad result has ensued, and they rejoice or sorrow accordingly.
He went listlessly, with bent head and stooped shoulders, like an old man who bore upon his back the weight of a great sorrow.
We've sorrow enough in the natural way, When it comes to burying Christian clay.
By that Heaven that bends above us -- by that God we both adore -- Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore -- Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.
I dare say I shall in some degree: it was not without sorrow I parted with her sister.
But she went away kindly, leaving Anne alone to keep her first vigil with sorrow.
Tom nodded, and then sat down on the shoe-board, while the old man told his tale, and wiped his spectacles, and fairly flowed over with quaint, homely, honest sorrow.