song


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sing off the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songsheet

sing off the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songbook

sing from the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songsheet

sing from the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songbook

siren song

Something that is seductive, enticing, or appealing, but that is or may prove to be dangerous, destructive, or disastrous. Alludes to the Sirens of Greek mythology, beautiful sea creatures who lured sailors to their deaths with enchanting music and voices. Even though most people see the risks of gambling, it's possible rewards remain a siren song to many. After his hit single brought the singer overnight fame and fortune, he was quickly lured by the siren song of drugs, alcohol, and promiscuous sexual activity.
See also: song

go for a song

To be sold for a very (and perhaps surprisingly) low price. Wow, I can't believe they let so many things at their yard sale go for a song. I would have marked up the prices a bit.
See also: song

song and dance

1. A long and elaboriate explanation or presentation. Primarily heard in US. The whole song and dance to introduce the keynote speaker lasted longer than her speech!
2. A long and elaboriate explanation told with the intent to deceive someone or justify something. When I questioned her about her tardiness, she gave me some song and dance about her car breaking down.
See also: and, dance, song

be on song

To be performing very well. Primarily heard in UK. After that terrible rehearsal, it's a miracle that the band was on song during the concert. It seems that their goalie is on song again after that serious injury last season.
See also: on, song

*for a song

Fig. cheaply. (As if the singing of a song were payment. *Typically: buy something ~; get something ~; pick up someone ~.) No one else wanted it, so I picked it up for a song. I could buy this house for a song, because it's so ugly.
See also: song

go into a song and dance (about something)

 and go into the same old song and dance about something
Fig. to start repeating excuses or stories about something. Please don't go into your song and dance about how you always tried to do what was right. John went into his song and dance about how he won the war all by himself. He always goes into the same old song and dance every time he makes a mistake.
See also: and, dance, song

sell something for a song

Fig. to sell something for very little money. (As in trading something of value for the singing of a song.) I had to sell my car for a song because I needed the money in a hurry. I have two geometry books and I would sell one of them for a song.
See also: sell, song

swan song

Fig. the last work or performance of a playwright, musician, actor, etc., before death or retirement. His portrayal of Lear was the actor's swan song. We didn't know that her performance last night was the singer's swan song.
See also: song, swan

burst into something

to begin to produce a lot of something The children burst into tears when they saw their ruined toys. The car burst into flames. The whole situation was so ridiculous, I simply burst into laughter.
Related vocabulary: break into something
See also: burst

for a song

very cheaply Land in the territory could be bought for a song in those days.
See also: song

a song and dance

  (American)
a long and complicated statement or story, especially one that is not true (usually + about ) She gave me some song and dance about her kids always being sick and not being able to get to the meetings.
See also: and, dance, song

be on song

  (British)
to be playing or performing well Ravanelli looked a bit tired in last Saturday's match but he's certainly on song tonight.
See also: on, song

for a song

very cheaply This is one of my favourite pieces of furniture and I got it for a song in a market. Property prices have come right down - houses are going for a song (= being sold very cheaply) at the moment.
See also: song

make a song and dance about something/doing something

  (British & Australian)
to make something seem more important than it really is so that everyone notices it I only asked her to move her car but she made such a song and dance about it. He made a real song and dance about giving up meat.
See also: and, dance, make, song

burst into

1. Also, burst out in or into . Break out into sudden activity. For example, burst into flames means "break out in a fire," as in This dry woodpile may well burst into flames. A version of this term, which dates from the 16th century, was used figuratively by John Milton: "Fame is the spur ... But the fair guerdon [reward] when we hope to find, and think to burst out into sudden blaze" ( Lycidas, 1637).
2. Also, burst out. Give sudden utterance to. For example, burst into tears or laughter or song or speech or burst out crying or laughing or singing , etc. mean "begin suddenly to weep, laugh, sing," and so on, as in When she saw him, she burst into tears, or I burst out laughing when I saw their outfits, or When they brought in the cake, we all burst into song. These terms have been so used since the late 1300s.
See also: burst

for a song

Very cheaply, for little money, especially for less than something is worth. For example, "I know a man ... sold a goodly manor for a song" (Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well, 3:2). This idiom alludes to the pennies given to street singers or to the small cost of sheet music. [Late 1500s]
See also: song

song and dance

An elaborate story or effort to explain and justify something, or to deceive and mislead someone. For example, Do you really believe his song and dance about the alarm not going off, being stopped for speeding, and then the car breaking down? or At every annual meeting the chairman goes through the same song and dance about the company's great future plans . This term originally referred to a vaudeville act featuring song and dance. [Late 1800s]
See also: and, dance, song

swan song

A final accomplishment or performance, one's last work. For example, I'm resigning tomorrow; this project was my swan song. This term alludes to the old belief that swans normally are mute but burst into beautiful song moments before they die. Although the idea is much older, the term was first recorded in English only in 1890.
See also: song, swan

burst into

v.
1. To enter some place suddenly and forcefully: The police burst into the room and conducted a raid.
2. To start doing something suddenly: Sometimes we burst into song while we're hiking in the mountains.
See also: burst

for a song

Informal
At a low price: bought the antique tray for a song.
See also: song

swan song

Last effort. An ancient belief held that swans, who are usually silent, burst into beautiful song with their dying breaths. As a phrase, “swan song” connotes a last burst of energy before expiring.
See also: song, swan
References in classic literature ?
She so bewitched them with her plaintive songs and her wonderful beauty that they forgot everything else to gaze up at her, and so they presently drifted among the broken reefs and were lost.
Bruno checked his song, and, as she slowly made her way through the long grass, he suddenly rushed out headlong at her like a little bull, shouting "Look the other way
In the course of years they will gradually disappear; their songs will die away like the echoes they once awakened, and the Canadian voyageurs will become a forgotten race, or remembered, like their associates, the Indians, among the poetical images of past times, and as themes for local and romantic associations.
Bird,' he said, 'what a beautiful song that is you sing
And on the top-most spray of the Rose-tree there blossomed a marvellous rose, petal following petal, as song followed song.
Yea, truly," quoth Robin Hood, when the Tanner had made an end of singing, "it is as I remember it, a fair ditty, and a ballad with a pleasing tune of a song.
Well, you don't look for much of a voice in a comic song.
It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
That makes a popular song popular, and the time is coming when it will take the place of all other songs.
The song of the sea from the lips of the shell--Pshaw
And Big-Fat said it was good, and the Bug sang another song about how good it was to observe the law, and what a fine land the Sea Valley was, and how every man who loved the Sea Valley should go forth and kill the bad Meat-Eaters.
A Labourer lay listening to a Nightingale's song throughout the summer night.
Though Cormac's hundred bards were there to give the fight to song, feeble was the voice of a hundred bards to send the deaths to future times.
In the greatness of his later success his debt to the current body of song and music should not be overlooked.
You are sad,' the Knight said in an anxious tone: 'let me sing you a song to comfort you.