soldier

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soldier of fortune

1. A soldier who serves the person or organization paying him or her, rather than his or her country; a mercenary. Although the nation only had a small population, it boosted the size of its army by hiring soldiers of fortune.
2. A person who seeks adventure or military engagement for money, pleasure, or fame. The novel depicts a soldier of fortune who risks his life for notoriety.
See also: fortune, of, soldier

soldier on

to continue to do something in a determined way, esp. when you know you may not succeed She was working with these gorgeous guys, and she managed to soldier on despite being a bit intimidated by them.
See also: on, soldier

a soldier of fortune

  (literary)
someone who fights for any country or group that will pay him A soldier of fortune in the service of both Christian and Muslim kings, he was constantly fighting from 1065.
See also: fortune, of, soldier

dead soldier

Also, dead man. An empty liquor, wine, or beer bottle, as in Their trash barrel's full of dead soldiers; they must drink a lot, or That dead man sticking out of your pocket alerted the officer to the fact that you'd been drinking. Dead man has been slang for "empty bottle" since the late 1600s but has been largely replaced by dead soldier, dating from the late 1800s.
See also: dead, soldier

dead soldier

and dead man and dead marine and dead one
1. n. an empty liquor or beer bottle. Toss your dead soldiers in the garbage, please. There’s a dead one under the bed and another in the fireplace!
2. n. a cigarette butt. (Less common than sense 1) The bum found a dead soldier on the ground and picked it up.
See also: dead, soldier

old soldier

1. n. a cigarette or cigar butt; a hunk of tobacco. The tramp bent over to pick up an old soldier off the pavement.
2. n. an empty liquor bottle; an empty beer bottle or can. Larry hid all his old soldiers under the bed.
See also: old, soldier

soldier

1. n. a liquor bottle; an empty liquor bottle. (see also dead soldier.) Toss your soldier into the garbage, please.
2. n. a whole tobacco cigarette. The old man almost fell over trying to pick up the soldier from the sidewalk.

soldier rag

n. a cap to cover a hairdo. The mugger was wearing a soldier rag and threatened me with a gun.
See also: rag, soldier
References in classic literature ?
But the three soldiers took the little whip, whipped as much money as they wanted, and lived happily to their lives end.
When the Dragon had gone to bed, his old grandmother pulled up the stone and let out the soldier.
They did this because, subsisting on their pay and without territory, they were unable to support many soldiers, and a few infantry did not give them any authority; so they were led to employ cavalry, with a moderate force of which they were maintained and honoured; and affairs were brought to such a pass that, in an army of twenty thousand soldiers, there were not to be found two thousand foot soldiers.
He was the leader of the famous "Company of St George," composed entirely of Italian soldiers.
If the enemy sees an advantage to be gained and makes no effort to secure it, the soldiers are exhausted.
One gray dawn, however, he was kicked in the leg by the tall soldier, and then, before he was entirely awake, he found himself running down a wood road in the midst of men who were panting from the first effects of speed.
The crowd had rolled back, and were now huddled together nearly at the extremity of the street, while the soldiers had advanced no more than a third of its length.
Other soldiers heard the noise, and ran hastily from the barracks to assist their comrades.
shouted the regimental commander, thrusting forward his jaw and pointing at a soldier in the ranks of the third company in a greatcoat of bluish cloth, which contrasted with the others.
And the old errand man looked quite pleased, nodded, and took the pewter soldier over to the old house.
I climbed the topmost summit, And my gaze swept far and wide For the garden roof where my brother stood, And I fancied that he sighed: My brother serves as a soldier With his comrades night and day; But my brother is wise, and may yet return, Though the dead lie far away.
The lady had now brought the water, which the soldier drank.
When the soldier heard all this good counsel, he determined to try his luck: so he went to the king, and said he was willing to undertake the task.
Tip slipped away from the girls and followed swiftly after the Soldier with the Green Whiskers.
The Soldier with the Green Whiskers now led them all through the gate and into a little room built in the wall.