sold


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sell (one's) birthright for a mess of pottage

To exchange something of great, important, or fundamental value for some financial gain that proves to be of little, trivial, or no value but which appears to be attractive or valuable on first reckoning. An allusion to Esau in Genesis 25:29–32, who sells to Jacob his birthright to his family's estate for a bowl of lentil stew (pottage). If we allow our obsession with job creation to undermine the health of the environment, humanity will ultimately end up selling its birthright for a mess of pottage.
See also: birthright, mess, of, pottage, sell

sell (one's) birthright for a bowl of soup

To exchange something of great, important, or fundamental value for some financial gain that proves to be of little, trivial, or no value but which appears to be attractive or valuable on first reckoning. (A variant of "sell one's birthright for a mess of pottage," an allusion to Esau in Genesis 25:29–32, who sells to Jacob his birthright to his family's estate for a bowl of lentil stew (pottage).) If we allow our obsession with job creation to undermine the health of the environment, humanity will ultimately end up selling its birthright for a bowl of soup.
See also: birthright, bowl, of, sell, soup

sell (one's) body

To have sexual intercourse or perform sexual acts for money; to prostitute oneself. Things had become so desperate for Jacob that he even considered selling his body just to earn enough to eat each day.
See also: body, sell

sell woof tickets

To threaten or try to intimidate someone with threats of violence or menacing, boastful words. There's this guy in the bar, drunk off his head, going around selling woof tickets to anyone who'll listen. He's going to get himself knocked out if he's not careful. If he tries to sell you woof tickets, don't rise to it—I know for a fact that he carries a knife and would be all too happy to put it to use.
See also: sell, ticket, woof

sell wolf tickets

To threaten or try to intimidate someone with threats of violence or menacing, boastful words. There's this guy in the bar, drunk off his head, going around selling wolf tickets to anyone who'll listen. He's going to get himself knocked out if he's not careful. If he tries to sell you wolf tickets, don't rise to it—I know for a fact that he carries a knife and would be all too happy to put it to use.
See also: sell, ticket, wolf

sell a wolf ticket

To threaten or try to intimidate someone with threats of violence or menacing, boastful words. There's this guy in the bar, drunk off his head, going around selling a wolf ticket to anyone who'll listen. He's going to get himself knocked out if he's not careful. If he tries to sell you a wolf ticket, don't rise to it—I know for a fact that he carries a knife and would be all too happy to put it to use.
See also: sell, ticket, wolf

sell out (to someone)

 
1. to sell everything, such as all one's property or one's company, to someone. The farmer finally gave up and sold out to a large corporation. I refuse to sell out no matter what they offer me.
2. to betray someone or something to someone. I think that you have sold out to the enemy!
See also: out, sell

sell out (to someone)

 
1. to sell everything, such as all one's property or one's company, to someone. The farmer finally gave up and sold out to a large corporation. I refuse to sell out no matter what they offer me.
2. to betray someone or something to someone. I think that you have sold out to the enemy!
See also: out, sell

sell someone out

 and sell someone down the river
to betray someone; to reveal damaging information about someone. Bill told everything he knew about Bob, and that sold Bob down the river. You'll be sorry if you sell me out. Lefty sold out his friends, and we'll all soon be arrested.
See also: out, sell

sell something out

to sell all of something. Have they sold their supply out yet? The stores sold out their stocks of that game long before Christmas.
See also: out, sell

sold on someone or something

convinced of the value of someone or something. I'm not yet sold on your idea. The crowd was sold on Gary. Nothing he had done or could do would cool their enthusiasm.
See also: on, sold

sold out

[of a product] completely sold with no more items remaining; [of a store] having no more of a particular product. The tickets were sold out so we couldn't go to the concert. I wanted new shoes like yours, but they were sold out.
See also: out, sold

sell out

to accept money to stop following your principles So many musicians simply sell out to the demands of the industry and abandon their art.
See also: out, sell

sell out somebody/something

also sell somebody/something out
to stop being loyal to someone or something He accused Congress of selling out the American people to lawyers who opposed the bill. I could sell you all out and go straight to the police with this information.
Usage notes: often money is the advantage that is gotten: Anyone who would sell out his own country for money deserves to go to prison for life.
Related vocabulary: sell somebody down the river
See also: out, sell

sell out (of something)

to sell all of something, so that there is none left We sold out of the souvenir T-shirts in the first couple of hours. During the summer the campgrounds are sold out each night. Her cruises regularly book up months in advance and almost always sell out.
See also: out, sell

be sold a pup

  (British informal)
to be tricked into buying something that is not worth anything I'm afraid you've been sold a pup there. You should always get an expert to look over a second-hand car before you buy it.
See also: pup, sold

sell out

1. Dispose of entirely by selling. For example, The rancher finally sold out to the oil company, or The tickets to the concert were sold out a month ago. [Late 1700s]
2. Betray one's cause or colleagues, as in He sold out to the other side. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: out, sell

sell someone on

Convince or persuade someone of the worth or desirability of something, as in They were hoping to sell enough legislators on their bill so that it would pass easily, or Dave was really sold on that new car. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: on, sell

sell out

v.
1. To be sold completely: The tickets will sell out by tomorrow.
2. To sell one's entire supply of a particular item: I'm afraid we sold out all our ice cream, kids! The hardware store sold out of plywood as the hurricane moved closer to shore.
3. To cause some supply of merchandise to be sold completely. Used in the passive: We can't get into the theater because the tickets are sold out.
4. To cause some vendor to sell its entire supply of something. Used in the passive: I wanted to buy more spoons, but the store was sold out.
5. To sell one's entire stake in a business or venture: The owners of the liquor store plan to sell out as soon as they can find a buyer.
6. To betray one's cause or colleagues, especially for money: The disloyal baseball player sold out to another team.
7. To betray someone or something, especially for money: The manager sold out his staff in order to keep his own job. Our agent sold us out when she moved to a better company and dropped us as a client.
See also: out, sell

sell woof tickets

verb
See also: sell, ticket, woof

sold cober

(ˈsold ˈkobɚ)
mod. sober. (A deliberate spoonerism on cold sober. Similar to jober as a sudge.) What do you mean drunk? Why, I’m sold cober.
See also: sold

sold on someone or something

mod. convinced of the value of someone or something. The crowd was sold on Gary. Nothing he had done or could do would cool their enthusiasm.
See also: on, sold
References in periodicals archive ?
Clients who might be classified as "dealers," and taxed at high ordinary rates because they regularly bought and sold property in the past, still can structure their future sales transactions to be taxed at lower long-term capital gain rates.
Taxpayers age 55 and over who recently sold a principal residence and did not make a pre-TRA '97 Sec.
The selling shareholder's received buyer's stock has a stock basis essentially the same as the selling shareholder's sold business' stock.
If the home is not sold within two years of the time the NRX vacates it, it will no longer qualify as his principal residence under Sec.
She bought shares at $50 last April and sold them at a shade under $53 six months later, in October.
Hedging their bets, the Goddesses sold off their entire portfolio after the close of trading Thursday and ended the contest with $96,375.
In the beginning, they sold PCs equal in quality at less than half the Compaq price -- and people liked the idea of buying directly from Dell because most dealers weren't that technically knowledgeable.
But there's virtually no limit to a stock's price when it starts moving higher, so your loss can be much greater if you've sold the stock short.
Universal sold a ``Star Trek'' tunic designed for William Shatner for $3,225.
Also, CD's end-of-day price average traded to depressed levels since last week; with that in mind, our researchers generally find that this is good information in regard to traders who sold calls over the last week or so.
if you paid $3,000 for 100 shares and you sold them for $3,500, the $500 is taxable as capital gains A benefit of holding stocks is you avoid taxes on any increased value, Kay says.
The stock's end-of-day price 15-period rate-of-change average climbed to elevated territory since last week; technically speaking, our analysts think that this is positive information for traders who sold puts.
All of these prominent African American-owned businesses, founded by pioneering black entrepreneurs, were sold to white-owned companies, to the consternation of many African Americans.
In addition, MU's closing-price average ascended to elevated levels recently; with that in mind, our researchers are of the opinion that this is favorable news concerning traders who sold puts.
If you guess wrong, and the stock price goes up, say to $800, you will have to buy the stock back at a price higher than when you sold it.