soft money


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soft money

 and easy money
money obtained without much effort. Don't become dependent on soft money. In college he got spoiled by soft moneya check from his parents every week.
See also: money, soft

soft money

n. easy money; money obtained without much effort. There’s not even very much soft money around now.
See also: money, soft
References in periodicals archive ?
FECA, as interpreted, sought to limit--they raised soft money to fund
A 5 to 4 majority of the Court upheld restrictions on the raising and spending of previously unregulated political party soft money and a prohibition on corporations and labor unions using treasury funds to finance "electioneering communications," requiring that such ads may only be paid for with corporate and labor union political action committee (PAC) funds.
The Supreme Court upheld these provisions and summed up: "In the main we uphold BCFRA's two principal complementary features: the control of soft money and the regulation of electioneering communications.
The majority first addressed [section] 323(a), a provision that prohibits national party committees from raising and soliciting soft money.
The district court ruled that parties could raise soft money, but only to fund party-building activities, such as voter registration and GOTV operations.
The decision upheld the ban on federal candidates soliciting soft money.
Yet, the ban on soft money fundraising by the national parties will make elections significantly more uncompetitive.
The awful elections, where the soft money system was exploited by Bill Clinton especially, and we got Chinese money and the Indonesian gardener and the Lincoln bedroom and all that stuff.
Advocates of new campaign finance regulations might argue that their real concern is not the numbers but how soft money affects politics and policy.
Publicly, broadcasters have remained silent on the soft money issue, saying they would be perceived as greedy to complain.
The Bill would allow state and local parties to raise soft money, but only in amounts of pounds 6,250 or less.
The proposed Shays-Meehan bill would ban soft money or unlimited contributions to the national parties' coffers that are often used for voter mobilization and advertising.
7 million in soft money down on the parties to protect their outrageous profit margins.