sod off


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sod off

v. Chiefly British Vulgar Slang
To go away. Used chiefly as a command.
See also: off, sod
References in periodicals archive ?
Commanding officer Colonel Gil Baldwin said: "When ordered to withdraw, in true squaddie tradition, Spider told his squadron leader to sod off because he was not leaving without his kit
And how better to take it than by loudly telling sweaty old men with wandering hands simply to sod off.
Still, let's keep our fingers crossed that Rangers and Celtic finally get the nod and the pair of them sod off to pastures new.
During his time at Liverpool, Gerard Houllier often heard voices - usually 40,000 telling him to sod off.
WOULD Bruce Millington kindly sod off and pick on someone else who deserves the criticism?
And they both shake hands and sod off to count their cash.
Oh, hang on - they can't, because America would tell them to sod off if they dared to ask for state support.
But if he doesn't sod off, for the time being at least, he's in danger of ruining his reputation for ever.
He texted me every 10 minutes until I texted him to sod off - which was within the rules because my mouth was shut as I disrespected him.
These people are here to live and work in this city and hold the key to our long-term future, far more than some gravy train of City of Culture judges flown around on a red carpet before they sod off back to the capital, never to be seen again.
I'd have told them all to sod off to let me suffer in peace.
Now I think it's time to book a flight and sod off somewhere hot where it doesn't really happen.
If those same people had told Jodi how to bring up her little girl she'd have quite rightly told them to sod off.
They will be able to pay their own way in the world because they told the banks and bondholders to sod off.