soap

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don't drop the soap!

vulgar Mocking pseudo-advice given to a man who might be or is about to be sent to prison, referring to prison rape that may occur if one bends over to retrieve dropped soap in the shower, thus exposing himself. You were sentenced to five years for selling drugs? Tough luck, man, don't drop the soap!
See also: drop

wash (someone's) mouth out (with soap)

To punish someone for using rude, vulgar, or obscene language by cleaning his or her mouth with soap (usually used merely as a threat). If you kids don't stop cussing in this house, I'm going to wash your mouths out with soap!
See also: mouth, out, wash

not know (someone) from a bar of soap

To be completely unaware of or know nothing about someone; to have never met the person indicated. My girlfriend got really excited when a movie star apparently walked past us, but I wouldn't know him from a bar of soap. Someone I wouldn't know from a bar of soap just contacted me online, claiming to be a distant relative.
See also: bar, know, not, of, soap

in soaped-pig fashion

Unclear and/or vague. The phrase refers to a now-outdated form of entertainment in which people tried to catch soaped pigs. Please make a decisive statement somewhere in your next paper because writing in this soaped-pig fashion won't get you a good grade!
See also: fashion

soap plant

Any plant that produces a lather that can be used for cleansing. Examples include the California soap plant, the soapberry, and the soapwort. My mom makes all-natural soap out of soap plants.
See also: plant, soap

no dice

Inf. no; not possible. When I asked about a loan, he said, "No dice." No. It can't be done, no dice.
See also: dice

no soap

Inf. no. I can't do it. No soap. No soap, I don't lend anyone money.
See also: soap

soap someone or something down

to cover someone or something thoroughly with soap or suds. Mother soaped Timmy down and rinsed him off in warm water. she soaped down the floor.
See also: down, soap

soft soap

 
1. flattering talk; sweet talk. I don't mind a little soft soap. It won't affect what I decide, though. Don't waste my time with soft soap. I know you don't mean it.
2. (Usually soft-soap.) to attempt to convince someone (of something) by gentle persuasion. We couldn't soft-soap her into it. Don't try to soft-soap her. she's an old battle-ax.
See also: soap, soft

no dice

this result did not or will not happen no go The Giants could have made it an exciting ballgame, but no dice, they didn't even score.
See also: dice

no dice

  (American & Australian informal) also no soap (American)
something that you say in order to refuse a request or to make clear that something is not possible 'Can you lend me ten dollars?' 'Sorry, no dice - I don't have any money with me.' We were looking for a house to rent on the island but it was no soap.
See also: dice

no dice

Also, no go; no soap. No, certainly not; also, impossible. For example, Anthony wanted to borrow my new coat, but Mom said no dice, or We tried to rent the church for the wedding, but it's no go for the date you picked, or Jim asked Dad to help pay for the repairs, but Dad said no soap. All of these slangy expressions indicate refusal or an unsuccessful attempt. No dice, from the 1920s, alludes to an unlucky throw in gambling; no go, alluding to lack of progress, dates from about 1820; and no soap dates from about 1920 and possibly alludes to the phrase it won't wash, meaning "it won't find acceptance." Also see nothing doing; won't wash.
See also: dice

no soap

see under no dice.
See also: soap

soap opera

1. A radio or television serial with stock characters in domestic dramas that are noted for being sentimental and melodramatic. For example, She just watches soap operas all day long. This term originated in the mid-1930s and was so called because the sponsors of the earliest such radio shows were often soap manufacturers.
2. Real-life situation resembling one that might occur in a soap opera, as in She just goes on and on about her various medical and family problems, one long soap opera . [1940s]
See also: opera, soap

soft soap

Flattery, cajolery, as in She's only six but she's learned how to get her way with soft soap. This colloquial expression alludes to liquid soap, likening its slippery quality to insincere flattery. Its figurative use was first recorded in 1830.
See also: soap, soft

soap up

v.
1. To cover someone or something with soap: We soaped up the car, scrubbed well, and rinsed it clean. I soaped my legs up and shaved them.
2. To cover oneself with soap: I soaped up and rinsed off in the shower.
See also: soap, up

no dice

interj. no; not possible. When I asked about a loan, he said, No dice.
See also: dice

no soap

interj. no. No soap, I don’t lend anyone money.
See also: soap

soap

n. a soap opera. Soaps are very popular on college campuses these days.

soft soap

1. n. flattering talk; sweet talk. I don’t mind a little soft soap. It won’t affect what I do, though.
2. tv. to attempt to convince someone (of something) by gentle persuasion. Don’t try to soft soap her. She’s an old battle-ax.
See also: soap, soft

Well, wash my mouth out with soap

and WWMMOWS
sent. & comp. abb. a request indicating pretend remorse for saying something profane or objectionable. So you don’t like my advanced vocabulary. WWMMOWS.
See also: mouth, out, soap, wash

no dice

1. Of no use; futile.
2. Used as a refusal to a request.
See also: dice

no soap

Slang
1. Not possible or permissible.
2. Unsuccessful; futile.
See also: soap

no dice

An absolute refusal. According to one explanation, courts would not convict gamblers at illegal craps games unless they were caught with dice (swallowing the evidence was not an uncommon way to get rid of it). “No dice, no conviction” was the watchword that referred to that refusal to convict.
See also: dice
References in periodicals archive ?
As soon as I got home I remedied it with my herbal soaps and was back on track.
As a Clinical Psychologist with over 25 years of experience with children, combined with Masters' role as a mother, she was truly able to delve into the joys of soap making with her son.
She mentioned some of the herbs that she uses in her soaps such as chamomile, bay laurel leaves, and chocolate for kids.
com to view its selection of soaps and bedside tables.
Everyone always asks us "How did you get started making soap though?
Nestled among the 2,000-year-old labyrinthine streets in courtyard houses and old hotels known as khans, are a handful of workshops that have been making the famed Savon d'Alep, or Aleppo soap, by hand for hundreds of years.
The soaps produced by these local women are galaxies apart from those found in the grocery.
Days after the FDA panel met, a coalition of 17 public health groups asked the FDA to immediately ban triclosan from soaps, cleaners, and other household products.
However, if hands are visibly soiled or in contact with potentially infectious material, then a wash with soap and water is required.
The network's profitability depends upon revenues from advertisers and from a show's sponsor (which, in the case of four soaps today, is still the show's owner, i.
However, I believe soaps are of huge interest because they tell us a lot about ourselves.
2 shows the results of an evaluation of cutaneous barrier maintenance of two bar soaps in humans (in vivo).
This addiction to soaps is a nationwide phenomenon, which crosses class and, increasingly, gender boundaries.
The story line is welcome, if overdue, says Michael Logan, TV Guide's soaps columnist: "How much longer could they have a lesbian character who is young, who is attractive, who is really personable, and not give her a romance?
GOOD CLEAN FUN: Most of us have tried Ivory, Dial and Dove, but there are so many more other lather-worthy soaps to try, which you'll learn all about in Lisl and Landt Dennis' ``Soap for Body and Soul'' (Stewart, Tabori & Chang; $17.