soak

(redirected from soaks)
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Related to soaks: soaked up

be soaked through

To be extremely or thoroughly wet, especially through multiple layers. Oh, you poor thing, you're soaked through! Come in out of the rain and sit down by the fire this instant! I was soaked through after Daniel pushed me into the pool. I wish I hadn't left my bag outside. Now my books are all soaked through!
See also: soak

be soaked to the bone

To be extremely or completely wet, especially through one's clothing. Oh, you poor thing, you're soaked to the bone! Come in out of the rain and sit down by the fire this instant! I was soaked to the bone after Daniel pushed me into the pool.
See also: bone, soak

soaked through

Extremely or completely wet, especially through one's clothing. I can't believe you pushed me into the pool! Now I have to walk home soaked through! The kids let themselves get soaked through out in the rain, and now one of them is coming down with a cold!
See also: soak

soaked to the bone

Extremely or completely wet, especially through one's clothing. I can't believe you pushed me into the pool! Now I have to walk home soaked to the bone! The kids let themselves get soaked to the bone out in the rain, and now one of them is coming down with a cold!
See also: bone, soak

soak (someone or something) through

To make someone or something extremely or thoroughly wet, especially through multiple layers. Jane soaked my books through when she sprayed me with the garden hose on my way home from school. I hope the kids get home soon, or that rain is going to soak them through!
See also: soak

soak (someone) to the bone

To make someone extremely or completely wet, especially through his or her clothing. Jane soaked the other kids to the bone with the garden hose. I hope the kids get home soon, or that rain is going to soak them to the bone!
See also: bone, soak

go soak your head

A dismissive phrase said to someone who the speaker is frustrated or annoyed with. A: "And how many car accidents have you gotten into?" B: "Oh, go soak your head—I'm a great driver!"
See also: head, soak

Go chase yourself!

 and Go climb a tree!; Go fly a kite!; Go jump in the lake!
Inf. Go away and stop bothering me! Bob: Get out of here. Bill! You're driving mecrazy! Go chase yourself'. Bill: What did I do to you? Bob: You're just in the way. Bill: Dad, can I have ten bucks? Father: Go climb a tree! Fred: Stop pestering me, John. Go jump in the lake! John: What did I do? Bob: Well, Bill, don't you owe me some money? Bill: Go fly a kite!
See also: chase

soak in(to something)

[for moisture] to penetrate something. The rain soaked into the parched ground as fast as it fell. I'm glad it soaked in. I was afraid it would run off.
See also: soak

soak one's face

Sl. to drink heavily. They're down at the tavern soaking their faces. Well, I guess I'll go soak my face in a few beers.
See also: face, soak

soak someone or something with something

to get someone or something thoroughly wet with some liquid. The rain soaked us all with icy cold drops of water. The storm soaked the land with much-needed moisture.
See also: soak

soak someone to the skin

[for water, rain, or other liquid] to work its way through someone's clothing to the skin. The storm soaked us all to the skin. she soaked herself to the skin in the storm.
See also: skin, soak

soak something in something

to leave something immersed in a liquid, intending for it to be absorbed. soak your feet in Epsom salts to make them feel better. I had to soak my elbow in ice water to take down the swelling.
See also: soak

soak something off (of) something

 and soak something off
to remove something, such as a label or surface soil, from something by soaking in a liquid. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) she soaked the labels off the bottles and jars. Please soak off the label.
See also: off, soak

soak something out of something

 and soak something out
to remove something, such as a stain, from something by soaking in a liquid. Dan soaked the stain out of his shirt and then washed it. Dan soaked out the stain.
See also: of, out, soak

soak something up

 
1. Lit. to gather up moisture or a liquid, using an absorbent cloth, paper, etc. Alice soaked the spill up with a sponge. she soaked up the spilled milk.
2. Lit. [for cloth, paper, or other absorbent material] to absorb moisture or a liquid. Please get some paper towels to soak the spill up. The sponge soaked up the orange juice.
3. Fig. to learn or absorb some information; to learn much information. I can't soak information up as fast as I used to be able to. The tourists will soak up anything you tell them.
See also: soak, up

soak through something

[for liquid] to work its way through something, such as cloth or paper. Please wipe up that mess before it soaks through the tablecloth. It's too late. The grape juice has soaked through the carpet into the mat.
See also: soak

soaked to the skin

wet clear through one's clothing to the skin. I was caught in the rain and got soaked to the skin. oh, come in and dry off! You must be soaked to the skin.
See also: skin, soak

soaked to the skin

to be extremely wet I forgot my umbrella and got soaked to the skin when I had to go out this afternoon.
See also: skin, soak

soak up something

also soak something up
1. to enjoy something I just want to lie on the beach and soak up the sun. What does he think of all the praise he's getting? He's soaking it up.
2. to learn and remember something easily and quickly Jill soaks up everything that's said in class. Music came naturally to him, and when he heard something, he soaked it up and could play it.
3. to use all of something The price of heating oil will not rise until the cold weather soaks up the huge amount waiting to be sold. There was a budget surplus, but the needs of the military will surely soak it up.
See also: soak, up

be soaked to the skin

to be extremely wet The rain was so heavy we were soaked to the skin after only ten minutes.
See also: skin, soak

go fly a kite

Also, go chase yourself or climb a tree or jump in the lake or sit on a tack or soak your head . Go away and stop bothering me, as in Quit it, go fly a kite, or Go jump in the lake. All of these somewhat impolite colloquial imperatives date from the first half of the 1900s and use go as described under go and.
See also: fly, kite

soaked to the skin

Also, soaked through. Drenched, extremely wet, as in What a downpour; I'm soaked to the skin, or She fell in the stream and was soaked through. The implication in this idiom implies that water has penetrated one's clothing, so one is thoroughly wet. The phrase to the skin has been so used since about 1600; it and the variant were combined in Randle Cotgrave's Dictionary (1611) as "Wet through, or (as we say) to the skin."
See also: skin, soak

soak up

1. Absorb, take in, as in I lay there, soaking up the sun, or She often went to hear poets read their work, soaking up every word. This usage, alluding to absorbing a liquid, dates from the mid-1500s.
2. Drink to excess, as in She can really soak up her beer.
See also: soak, up

soak in

v.
To penetrate or permeate; seep: Wait until the dye soaks in before you handle the fabric. The speaker paused to let her words soak in.
See also: soak

soak out

v.
To remove something, such as a stain, by continued immersion: She threw her shirt in a tub of water to soak out the pasta sauce before it set. The ink stain looked permanent, but he tried to soak it out anyway.
See also: out, soak

soak through

v.
To drench someone or something: I forgot to cover my backpack, and now my sleeping bag is soaked through. The rainstorm soaked me through to the skin.
See also: soak

soak up

v.
1. To absorb something, such as a liquid, through or as if through pores: The towel under the sink soaks the leaking water up. The quilt used to hang in the barn, and I'm afraid it soaked up some of the smell.
2. To take in or accept something mentally, especially eagerly and easily: I soaked up the atmosphere as I wandered its streets. The student soaked up everything the teacher said.
See also: soak, up

Go chase yourself!

and Go chase your tail! and Go climb a tree! and Go fly a kite! and Go fry an egg! and Go jump in the lake! and Go soak your head! and Go soak yourself!
exclam. Beat it!; Go away! Oh, go chase yourself! Go soak your head! You’re a pain in the neck.
See also: chase

Go soak your head!

verb
See also: soak

Go soak yourself!

verb
See also: soak

soak

1. in. to drink heavily; to get drunk. (see also soaked.) The two old ladies put on their coats and went out to soak.
2. n. a drinking bout. Both guys declined to go out and stayed home and enjoyed a soak in front of the TV.
3. n. a drunkard. Some old soak lay moaning in the gutter.
4. tv. to overcharge someone; to extort money from someone. They soaked me for twenty dollars for the parts, but at least it runs now.

soak one’s face

tv. to drink heavily. They’re down at the tavern soaking their faces.
See also: face, soak

soaked

mod. alcohol intoxicated. All the guys came home soaked.
See also: soak

go fly a kite

Get lost! Kite flying is an activity that is done far less now than in previous centuries. Accordingly, “go fly a kite!” is heard far less than “get lost!” “take a hike!” and “get your ass out of here!” (or something stronger).
See also: fly, kite
References in periodicals archive ?
Horner hit 37 as the Soaks reached 127-4 in dramatic fashion to go through.
It's been one heck of a day at work, and you are ready to soak your troubles away.
The investigation showed that after 4 coats had been applied, the soak back into the primary coat was minimal.
Golcar Soaks replied with an excellent opening stand, Nick Jagger making 36 and Chris Fawcette 29, but then with Wanderers change bowler, Brooke took three for 25 to slow the Soaks' response.
Golcar Soaks are pictured with the trophy after beating Meltham Wanderers in the Waterfront Huddersfield Evening League Emmerson Cup |final at Slaithwaite CC DAVID HUGHES
Drops that hit soil often soak in; some of that water later evaporates, while much of the rest seeps through the earth to replenish aquifers and nourish springs.
If precipitation doesn't soak into the urban landscape, it isn't available to absorb heat, evaporate, and thereby cool the city, explains David J.
Heat soak resulted in excessive splay and black streaks even near the gate.
Hey," she adds with a laugh, "at home, they can have the remote control in their hand while enjoying a luxurious foot soak, and no one will complain.
If the piece is yellowed or if there are stains, soak it in a solution of hot water and nonchlorine bleach in a noncorrosive tub.
Delhi sustained severe chemical burns to both front legs when Hawthorn Corporation used undiluted formaldehyde to soak her feet.
Mandara Spa Island Paradise Pampering Bath Soak, PS12, Sainsbury's.
The Body Shop has bottled the moisturising magic of honey up, so you can soak in it until your heart's content.
I've heard that I should soak my feet at night in hot water; I've heard that I should soak my feet at night in cold water.
To revive your spirits at the end of a long day, there's nothing like a leisurely foot soak.