snow in


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snow someone or something in

[for heavy snowfall] to block someone or something in a place. The sudden storm snowed us in. The storm snowed in most of the people in town.
See also: snow

snow in

v.
1. To cause something to be inoperable or unable to move safely due to snow. Used chiefly in the passive: The airport was snowed in, and no flights left that day. The school buses were snowed in, so classes were canceled.
2. To cause someone or something to remain inside due to snow: The blizzard had snowed in all the townspeople, and all the restaurants were closed. A sudden storm had snowed us in, and we were worried that we would run out of food.
3. To cause something to be surrounded by snow: The storm snowed in the mountain and confined the climbers to their tents. One winter, a blizzard snowed their cabin in, and they had to tunnel out the window.
See also: snow
References in classic literature ?
At one extremity of this patch of desolation, overhung by bare and forbidding crags which husbanded drifts of everlasting snow in their shaded cavities, was a small stretch of thin and discouraged grass, and a man and a family of pigs were actually living here in some shanties.
A whiff of warm air ascended to his nostrils, and there, curled up under the snow in a snug ball, lay Billee.
But, while I was considering this, there came in four French gentlemen, who, having been stopped on the French side of the passes, as we were on the Spanish, had found out a guide, who, traversing the country near the head of Languedoc, had brought them over the mountains by such ways that they were not much incommoded with the snow; for where they met with snow in any quantity, they said it was frozen hard enough to bear them and their horses.
But though they found her deep in snow in the Figs, it seemed impossible to thank Maimie, for they could not waken her.
For the snow in the foreground I used my 3/4 ins flat brush and did a few strokes of blue here and there, followed by a mix of the same of blue with burnt sienna.
And there are some brilliant quirky clips too, including Durham University students descending on the city for its RAG antics in 1956, children scrambling about in the snow in 1940 and the Newcastle Aero Club completing a hilarious obstacle course in 1926.
Snow in the city becomes slush almost as soon as it has fallen, as this picture shows in 1968Well, they may have cold feet but at least this gaggle of geese can show off their legs, as pale sunshine fails to melt the water of Sefton Park lake, Liverpool, in 1956 The chap to the top right not suffering from chilblains is Prince Albert on his stone plinth and bronze horse at St George's plateau, LiverpoolAt a time of trouble, the good man shines.