snook


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cock a snook at someone

to show or express defiance or scorn at someone. He cocked a snook at the traffic cop and tore up the ticket. The boy cocked a snook at the park attendant and walked on the grass.
See also: cock, snook

cock a snook

  (British old-fashioned)
to show that you do not respect something or someone by doing something that insults them (usually + at ) In the end he refused to accept his award, cocking a snook at the film industry for which he had such contempt.
See also: cock, snook

cock a snook

Thumb one's nose, as in As soon as the teacher turned her back, the boys cocked a snook at her. This expression was first recorded in 1791 and the precise source of snook, here used in the sense of "a derisive gesture," has been lost. It is more widely used in Britain but is not unknown in America.
See also: cock, snook
References in periodicals archive ?
At any rate, the really good news, certainly, is that the snook seem to be doing extremely well.
Mummy Snook must have noticed Casey was seldom sundered from her mobile, but was unperturbed.
INTUITIVE" Ben Snook, centre, founder of Mobile Patient Notes, watches Ivan Whitfield of Teesside University test out his invention on student Michael Thornburn , left
Snook and Moore had at a previous hearing admitted the sexual grooming of a 15-year-old girl, who they had contacted via Facebook.
It was not unknown for Snook to catch the train to London and run the same day, and be back for another race the following afternoon.
UPDATE: Rok chief executive Garvis Snook said cost control would remain a priority
When we came home, we thought we'd like to have a marathon here so we wouldn't have to travel," Snook said.
It was awesome, so exciting," said Snook, who volunteered as part of the hurdle and basket crew on the track during the Olympic Trials.
In the western Atlantic Ocean, common snook occur from [approximately equal to]34[degrees]N to [approximately equal to]25[degrees]S latitude (North Carolina to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), with common snook frequently captured in waters off Galveston and the southern tip of Texas (Robins & Ray 1986; Rivas 1986).
The daughter of Thelma Griffiths' (her married name) saw the advert, contacted Mr Snook and the childhood friendship was renewed.
In the Cardiff block of flats where both women lived, Marciana Snook was creating a din by slamming her front door.
Marciana Snook, 29, chewed the piece of flesh off and then spat it on the floor.
Family and friends feared Harold Snook, 84, would never leave hospital - especially after he saw his traumatised wife slowly die in the next bed.
Frail 87-year-old Elizabeth Snook never recovered from her ordeal and died a few months later.
During 1986-91, we examined 2088 common snook, Centropomus undecimalis, captured in Jupiter and Lake Worth inlets and adjacent waters on the east coast of Florida and 1784 common snook captured in Tampa Bay on the west coast of Florida.