snatch

(redirected from snatches)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to snatches: Power clean, thrusters

snatch (someone) from the jaws of death

To rescue someone at the last moment from near or certain death. Thankfully, the EMTs arrived to the crash in time to snatch the woman and her child from the jaws of death.
See also: death, jaw, of, snatch

be snatched from the jaws of death

To be rescued at the last moment from near or certain death. The drowning fishermen were snatched from the jaws of death by a passing cruise ship.
See also: death, jaw, of, snatch

piece of snatch

1. vulgar slang Someone with whom to have sexual intercourse or engage in sexual activity; a potential sexual partner. (Potentially pejorative or objectionable; usually said of a woman.) There's a fine-looking piece of snatch down at the end of the bar. I'm going to go over and talk to her, see if I can't make something happen.
2. vulgar slang By extension, sexual intercourse or activity in general. (Potentially pejorative or objectionable; usually said of a woman.) God, I haven't had a piece of snatch in weeks! I must be off my game or something.
See also: of, piece, snatch

snatch defeat from the jaws of victory

To fail, lose, or be defeated despite the appearance that one would be victorious, especially due to a mistake, error, or poor judgment. (An ironic reversal of the more common "snatch victory from the jaws of defeat.") We were ahead by nearly 20 points with less than half the quarter remaining—how on earth did we manage to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory like that? The candidate has led in the polls right up to election day, but with that unfortunate remark last night, he may well have snatched defeat from the jaws of victory.
See also: defeat, jaw, of, snatch, victory

snatch at someone or something

to grasp at someone or something. The mugger snatched at Jane just as she sprayed Mace on him. He snatched at the Mace, but it was too late.
See also: snatch

snatch someone or something (away) from someone or something

to grab and take someone or something from someone or something. The mother snatched her child away from the doctor and fled. she snatched the candy from the child.
See also: snatch

snatch someone out of the jaws of death

 and snatch someone from the jaws of death
Fig. to save someone from almost certain or imminent death. The soldier snatched the tiny child from the jaws of death.
See also: death, jaw, of, out, snatch

snatch something out of something

to grab something out of something. The police officer snatched the gun out of Don's hand. Mary snatched the piece of chicken out of the fire as soon as it fell in.
See also: of, out, snatch

snatch something up

 
1. Lit. to grasp something and lift it up. Tom snatched the last cookie up and popped it into his mouth. He snatched up the last piece of cake.
2. Fig. to collect or acquire as many of something as possible. The shoppers snatched the sale merchandise up very quickly. The shoppers snatched up the sale merchandise very quickly.
See also: snatch, up

snatch victory from the jaws of defeat

Cliché to win at the last moment. At the last moment, the team snatched victory from the jaws of defeat with a last-second full-court basket.
See also: defeat, jaw, of, snatch, victory

piece of ass

Also, piece of tail. Sexual intercourse, as in He was out for a piece of ass. [ Vulgar slang; mid-1900s]
See also: ass, of, piece

snatch at

v.
To attempt to grasp or seize something by grabbing at it suddenly: The police officer snatched at the gun in the robber's hand.
See also: snatch

piece of ass

and hunk of ass and hunk of tail and piece of snatch and piece of tail
1. n. someone considered as a partner in copulation. (Usually a female. Usually objectionable.) Man, isn’t he a fine looking piece of snatch?
2. n. an act of copulation; copulation with someone. (Usually objectionable.) If Todd doesn’t get a hunk of tail once a day, he’s real grouchy.
See also: ass, of, piece

piece of snatch

verb
See also: of, piece, snatch

snatch

1. tv. to kidnap someone. (Underworld.) We’re gonna snatch the kid when the baby-sitter comes out to see what happened.
2. n. a kidnapping. (Underworld.) The Bradley snatch had the detectives up all night for weeks.
3. tv. to grab something; to steal something. Snatch me the paper there on the table as you walk by, would you please?
4. n. a theft. (Underworld.) The snatch went off without a hitch except that the safe was empty.
5. n. women considered as a receptacle for the penis. (Rude and derogatory.) The sailor walked around the port, looking for some snatch.

snatched

mod. arrested. Everybody in the crack house got snatched in the bust.
See also: snatch

piece of ass

Vulgar Slang
A person, especially a woman, considered sexually attractive.
See also: ass, of, piece
References in classic literature ?
She sweeps a litter of disarranged papers out of her way; snatches a sheet of paper from her stationery case; and tries resolutely to write.
During the long hours of darkness they caught but fitful snatches of sleep, for the night noises of a great jungle teeming with myriad animal life kept their overwrought nerves on edge, so that a hundred times they were startled to wakefulness by piercing screams, or the stealthy moving of great bodies beneath them.
I thought of all this by snatches probably between my attacks of delirium--for an hour and a half or so before Colia's departure.
He ran out and ran in, smoked incessantly, played snatches on his violin, sank into reveries, devoured sandwiches at irregular hours, and hardly answered the casual questions which I put to him.
He lets one win the singles and collahs it as soon as one doubles it; gives the singles and snatches the doubles
One of the culprits snatches the purse while another who would be on a motorcycle would help him flee the spot.
POLICE have urged people to be vigilant after a spate of handbag snatches in Birmingham.
Each snatch is a "gotcha"--the snatcher giggles, grins, and leers until another player snatches one of his or her words and gets the chance to sneer or leer in turn.
More than 30 soldiers have been killed in Snatches in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003.