snap out of

snap out of something

Fig. to become suddenly freed from a condition. (The condition can be a depression, an illness, unconsciousness, etc.) I was very depressed for a week, but this morning I snapped out of it. It isn't often that a cold gets me down. Usually lean snap out of it quickly.
See also: of, out, snap

snap something out of something

 and snap something out
to remove something from something, causing an audible snap. Jeff snapped the plastic plug out of the socket. He snapped out the plug.
See also: of, out, snap

snap out of something

to stop experiencing something, esp. something unpleasant Davis snapped out of a two-year slump to win at the golf tournament.
Usage notes: usually used in the form snap out of it and sometimes given as advice: She's filled with grief, and just can't seem to snap out of it. Are you feeling guilty about not spending time with the kids? Well, snap out of it!
See also: of, out, snap

snap out of

Suddenly recover, as in You can't expect an entire economy to snap out of the doldrums overnight. This expression is also put as an imperative, Snap out of it! telling someone to return to his or her normal state of mind from an undesirable condition such as grief, self-pity, or depression; for example, Snap out of it, Stella; it's over and done with. [1920s]
See also: of, out, snap
References in periodicals archive ?
As Glaus endured his usual midsummer malaise, manager Mike Scioscia and hitting coach Mickey Hatcher preached patience, that eventually Glaus would snap out of it in a big way.
They're still waiting for veteran left-hander Jim Abbott to snap out of a 1-7 drought and are hoping rookie Shad Williams can contribute, but strong outings by Shawn Boskie and Mark Langston on Sunday lessened manager Marcel Lachemann's concerns considerably.