snake

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Related to snakes: Poisonous snakes

banana oil

Superfluous, disingenuous, or nonsensical talk, especially that which is meant to flatter someone or exaggerate something. Look, I know I won't get past the first round of this tournament, so you can stop feeding me banana oil.
See also: banana, oil

a snake in (one's) bosom

Someone whom one has befriended, taken care of, or treated well but proves to be traitorous, untrustworthy, deceitful, or ungrateful. (Used especially in the phrase "nourish/nurse/nurture a snake in one's bosom.") Well, it turns out that Margaret was quite a snake in my bosom. I put my neck on the line to get her a job in our company, and then she turns around and tries to get me fired! I thought our love was not only mutual but indestructible; and yet, I have nursed a snake in my bosom all these years: my darling husband has cast me out and run off with a younger woman.
See also: bosom, snake

nurse a snake in (one's) bosom

To befriend, look after, or take care of someone who proves to be traitorous, untrustworthy, deceitful, or ungrateful. I thought the profligate had seen the light and was seeking redemption, and so I took him into my care. But before long, I knew I had nursed a snake in my bosom, as I awoke one morning to find myself robbed blind! I thought our love was not only mutual but indestructible; and yet, I have nursed a snake in my bosom all these years: my darling husband has cast me out and run off with a younger woman.
See also: bosom, nurse, snake

nurture a snake in (one's) bosom

To befriend, look after, or take care of someone who proves to be traitorous, untrustworthy, deceitful, or ungrateful. I thought the profligate had seen the light and was seeking redemption, and so I took him into my care. But before long, I knew I had nurtured a snake in my bosom, as I awoke one morning to find myself robbed blind! I thought our love was not only mutual but indestructible; and yet, I have nurtured a snake in my bosom all these years: my darling husband has cast me out and run off with a younger woman.
See also: bosom, nurture, snake

nourish a snake in (one's) bosom

To befriend, look after, or take care of someone who proves to be traitorous, untrustworthy, deceitful, or ungrateful. I thought the profligate had seen the light and was seeking redemption, and so I took him into my care. But before long, I knew I had nourished a snake in my bosom, as I awoke one morning to find myself robbed blind! I thought our love was not only mutual but indestructible; and yet, I have nourished a snake in my bosom all these years: my darling husband has cast me out and run off with a younger woman.
See also: bosom, nourish, snake

snake oil salesman

Someone who sells, promotes, or is a general proponent of some valueless or fraudulent cure, remedy, or solution. (Can also be formed as "snake oil saleswoman" if referring to a woman, or "salesperson" to be gender neutral.) I find it hard to believe anyone would fall for those snake oil salesmen on TV selling holistic medicines and therapies. A lot of people have been swayed by the presidential candidate's plan for economic growth, but if you ask me, she sounds like a snake oil saleswoman.
See also: oil, salesman, snake

snake in the grass

One who feigns friendship with the intent to deceive. Did you hear that Daria's best friend stole money from her bank account? What a snake in the grass.
See also: grass, snake

go at something like a boy killing snakes

Rur. to do something with a great deal of energy. Once Mary decided to take that test, she went at her books like a boy killing snakes. I hired Joe to weed my garden, and he went at it like a boy killing snakes.
See also: boy, killing, like, snake

If it was a snake it woulda bit you.

Rur. It was very close to you. Jane: Where's the phone book? Tom: Right there! If it was a snake it woulda bit you. Bill: I can't find my other shoe. I've looked all over the house. Mary: It's right behind you. If it was a snake it would have bit you.
See also: bit, if, snake

like fighting snakes

Rur. chaotic; challenging. (As if every time one snake is subdued, another one attacks.) It's like fighting snakes to get anything done at this time of year. Arguing with you is like fighting snakes.
See also: fight, like, snake

seeing pink elephants

 and seeing pink spiders; Seeing snakes
intoxicated; recovering from a drinking bout; having the delirium tremens. When I got to the point of seeing pink elephants, I knew that something had to be done. The old one who's shakinghe's probably seeing snakes.
See also: elephant, pink, seeing

snake along

to move along in a curving line, looking like a snake; to move along in a line, moving as a snake moves. The train snaked along, gaining speed as it went downhill. The line of people waiting to buy tickets snaked along slowly.
See also: snake

snake in the grass

a sneaky and despised person. How could I ever have trusted that snake in the grass? John is such a snake in the grass.
See also: grass, snake

a snake in the grass

someone who pretends to be your friend while secretly doing things to harm you It's upsetting to learn that someone you once viewed as a good colleague is in fact a snake in the grass.
See also: grass, snake

snake oil

  (American informal)
advice or solutions to problems which are of no use
Usage notes: People used to sell substances called snake oil in the US which they said would cure illnesses but which were of no use.
In my opinion, government measures for balancing the budget are just so much snake oil. (American informal)
See also: oil, snake

banana oil

Nonsense, exaggerated flattery, as in I should be on television? Cut out the banana oil! The precise analogy in this idiom is not clear, unless it is to the fact that banana oil, a paint solvent and artificial flavoring agent, has no relation to the fruit other than that it smells like it. Possibly it is a variation on snake oil, a term for quack medicine that was extended to mean nonsense. [1920s]
See also: banana, oil

snake in the grass

A treacherous person, as in Ben secretly applied for the same job as his best friend; no one knew he was such a snake in the grass . This metaphor for treachery, alluding to a poisonous snake concealed in tall grass, was used in 37 b.c. by the Roman poet Virgil ( latet anguis in herba). It was first recorded in English in 1696 as the title of a book by Charles Leslie.
See also: grass, snake

snake oil

see under banana oil.
See also: oil, snake

viper in one's bosom

Also, snake in one's bosom. An ungrateful or treacherous friend, as in I got him dozens of freelance jobs, and then he told everyone I was a lousy musician-nothing like nourishing a viper in one's bosom . This metaphoric expression, often put as nourish a viper (or snake) in one's bosom, comes from Aesop's fable about a farmer who shelters a snake dying from the cold, which then fatally bites him after it recovers. It was referred to by Chaucer and Shakespeare, and appeared in numerous proverb collections.
See also: bosom, viper

banana oil

n. nonsense. I refuse to listen to any more of your childish banana oil.
See also: banana, oil

seeing pink elephants

and seeing pink spiders and seeing snakes
tv. alcohol intoxicated; recovering from a drinking bout; having the delirium tremens. When I got to the point of seeing pink elephants, I knew that something had to be done. He’s screaming something about seeing pink spiders, and he wants a drink.
See also: elephant, pink, seeing

seeing snakes

verb
See also: seeing, snake

snake

1. in. to scheme; to plot and plan. (Prisons.) He spent a lot of time snaking about that job.
2. tv. to steal something. Where did you snake that bike?

snake eyes

n. the two in dice, one spot on each die. The baby needs shoes, and all I get is snake eyes.
See also: eye, snake

snake in the grass

n. a sneaky and despised person. How could I ever have trusted that snake in the grass?
See also: grass, snake

trouser snake

and trouser trout
n. the penis. The doctor was taken aback when young Willard used the term “trouser snake.” Stop scratching your trouser trout in public.
See also: snake, trouser

banana oil

insincere or ridiculous talk. Like “horse feathers,” there's no such substance as banana oil. Also like “horse feathers,” the phrase Described something utterly preposterous. It has been attributed to Milt Gross, a cartoonist who first used the expression in his comic strips during the 1920s.
See also: banana, oil
References in classic literature ?
That happened to be the least ruined of any, and the big snake was delayed awhile before he could find a way up the stones.
I saw no more than a big snake making foolish circles till the dark came.
Roderick, amidst the throng of the street, laid his hand on this man's chest, and looking full into his forbidding face,"How is the snake to-day?
Pretending to look earnestly at this respectable person's stomach, Roderick assured him that his snake was a copper-head and had been generated by the immense quantities of that base metal with which he daily defiled his fingers.
You have swallowed a snake in a cup of sacramental wine," quoth he.
Professor Bumper seemed to fall backward as the grip of the serpent relaxed, but Tom, dropping his rifle, and calling to Ned to keep an eye on the snake, leaped forward and caught his friend.
It was the big boa that whipped itself around you, as you leaned over," explained Tom, as Ned came up to announce that the snake was no longer dangerous.
One of the bearers was bitten by a poisonous snake, and though prompt measures were taken, the poison spread so rapidly that the man died.
The Snake River here wound its devious way between low banks through the great plain of the Three Butes; and was bordered by wide and fertile meadows.
The lofty range of the Three Tetons, those great landmarks of the Rocky Mountains rising in the east and circling away to the north and west of the great plain of Snake River, and the mountains of Salt River and Portneuf toward the south, catch the earliest falls of snow.
As soon as the spring opens they move down the right bank of Snake River and encamp at the heads of the Boisee and Payette.
He caught the snake behind the hood, forced the mouth open with the blade of the knife, and showed the terrible poison-fangs of the upper jaw lying black and withered in the gum.
Thus beset the snake writhed and twisted horribly; but not for an instant did it loose its hold upon any of its intended victims, for it had included the ape-man in its cold embrace the minute that he had fallen upon it.
Tarzan had drawn his knife and this he now plunged rapidly into the body of the enemy; but the encircling folds promised to sap his life before he had inflicted a death wound upon the snake.
The great, wide-gaping jaws of the snake turned and hovered above him.