smoke

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smoke

1. n. a tobacco cigarette; a pipe of tobacco; a cigar. I think I’ll have a smoke now.
2. n. the act of smoking anything smokable, including drugs. I need a smoke—of anything. I’m going to stop here for a smoke.
3. n. methyl alcohol; bad liquor; any liquor. They call it smoke because when you mix it with water and shake it, it’s cloudy.
4. n. exaggeration; deception. (see also blow smoke, smoke and mirrors.) If the smoke is too obvious, they’ll just get suspicious.
5. tv. to annihilate someone; to shoot someone. (Underworld.) Rocko tried time and time again to smoke Marlowe, always without success.
6. tv. to beat someone in a contest; to outrun, outdistance, or outplay someone. Jill smoked Dave in the bicycle race.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Levels of tobacco use were defined as follows: nonsmokers -- subjects who never smoked or smoked less than 100 cigarettes in entire life, smokers -- subjects who had ever smoked cigarettes on more than one of the 30 days preceding the survey (USDHHS, 1998).
Only 29 percent of movie characters smoked in the 1970s, according to Stanton Glantz--less than half as many as before or since.
The nicotine kept your body weight low, and when you quit smoking, your body returns to the weight it would have been had you never smoked.
Of the 31 infants whose mothers smoked during pregnancy, 22 had NNK metabolites called NNAL and NNAL-Gluc in their urine.
In California and Massachusetts, where voters approved citizen initiatives to increase pack taxes, the average number of cigarettes smoked by adults fell annually by 2.
Riggio smoked his first cigar nearly a decade ago, but he doesn't remember the brand or the occasion.
Ten years after quitting, the mortality rate of former smokers is approximately the same as those who have never smoked, according to the U.
The mean number of cigarettes smoked at work also declined.
Dowds favors behavioral strategies, such as writing down the reason for each cigarette smoked or locking the pack in the trunk of one's car.
In his most recent research, Mattey, a senior scientist at the Staffordshire Rheumatology Centre in Stoke-on-Trent, England, determined that if a woman has ever smoked cigarettes, even if she has since quit, she is more likely to have a more severe form of rheumatoid arthritis than women who have never smoked.
By comparison, 33 percent of the teenage smokers in their study, conducted during 1990 and 1991, said they smoked Camels - a 66-fold increase.
After accounting for differences in demographics, diet, and lifestyle, the team found--not surprisingly--that arterial plaque builds up 50 percent faster in smokers than in people who had never smoked.
They also found that girls suffered more lung damage than boys who smoked the same amount.
But when people smoked the cigarettes, within three or four puffs they crushed the air vents with their lips or fingers.