smoke


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smoke

1. n. a tobacco cigarette; a pipe of tobacco; a cigar. I think I’ll have a smoke now.
2. n. the act of smoking anything smokable, including drugs. I need a smoke—of anything. I’m going to stop here for a smoke.
3. n. methyl alcohol; bad liquor; any liquor. They call it smoke because when you mix it with water and shake it, it’s cloudy.
4. n. exaggeration; deception. (see also blow smoke, smoke and mirrors.) If the smoke is too obvious, they’ll just get suspicious.
5. tv. to annihilate someone; to shoot someone. (Underworld.) Rocko tried time and time again to smoke Marlowe, always without success.
6. tv. to beat someone in a contest; to outrun, outdistance, or outplay someone. Jill smoked Dave in the bicycle race.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Secondhand smoke can cause heart disease and lung cancer in nonsmoking adults.
He knows what the science is, that no exposure to secondhand smoke is safe,'' said Bill Corr, director of the D.
A 2004 study by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found carcinogenic secondhand smoke in 94% of public places in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay.
RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: As residents of lesser developed countries continue to be exposed to high levels of biomass smoke at work or at home and continue to immigrate to developed countries, it is important that health care providers in developed countries be aware of biomass-smoke-related pulmonary disease.
teens smoke, even though most know that it is a danger to their health.
noted that a smoking ban not only reduces exposure to secondhand smoke but also encourages smokers to quit or cut back.
It's the easiest thing in the world to just run across the street and buy a pack of smokes.
Rozenberg began investigating the possible links between wood smoke pollution and lung ailments after one particularly grueling winter.
DeMatteo's case is the first court ruling banning a parent's smoking in a case where the child is by all accounts healthy and has no allergic or health-related reactions to smoke.
Lynch (1995) proposed that the failure of anti-tobacco use programs may have been inevitable by not considering intrinsic psychological factors due to the prevailing assumptions that young adults are driven solely by extrinsic and social factors when choosing to smoke or not to smoke.
And their message was unmistakable: Real men smoke.
When nicotine, a chemical in cigarette smoke, leaves your body, you may experience:
Paul Taylor, a chain-smoker himself, sent the following quote through his press representative: "If others don't want to smoke that's their business.
While those who still wish to smoke should be allowed to do so, the majority who desire neither this habit nor its high social costs are entitled to some relief.