sling your hook

sling (one's) hook

To go away; to vacate some place. He told them to sling their hook after he found out they'd been drinking on the job.
See also: hook, sling

sling your hook

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED, INFORMAL
If someone tells you to sling your hook, they are telling you to go away. One woman shouted to reporters `Sling your hook if you know what's good for you'. If Ruddock doesn't want to be part of this team then he should sling his hook. Note: The `hook' in this expression may be a ship's anchor, which had to be taken up and tied up with ropes or chains, which were called a sling, before the ship could move on.
See also: hook, sling

sling your hook

leave; go away. British informal
Sling your hook appears in a slang dictionary of 1874 , where it is defined as ‘a polite invitation to move on’.
1998 Times I now realise that Sylvia hasn't heard from him since she told him to sling his hook.
See also: hook, sling

sling your ˈhook

(British English, informal) (often used in orders) go away: That boy’s a real nuisance. I tried telling him to sling his hook but he simply ignored me.
See also: hook, sling