slid


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Related to slid: slide, I'd, call for, at least

slide off

To slip along the surface of something and fall off. All of the toppings slid off my ice cream sundae before I could take a single bite! Be careful, or that stack of books will slide right off the table.
See also: off, slide

slide into (one's)/the DMs

slang To successfully flirt with someone via direct message (DM) on social media. If you're trying to slide into your crush's DMs, don't use a cheesy pick-up line. A: "I just slid into the DMs and asked her out on a date." B: "Wow, I can't believe that actually worked!"
See also: DM, slide

slide along

1. To move forward while maintaining smooth, continual contact (over the length of something). I love ice skating. There is something so calming about spending an afternoon just sliding along on the ice. We slipped and slid along the icy path until we finally reached the parking lot.
2. To cause someone or something to move forward while maintaining continual contact (over the length of something). In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "along." Please don't slide those crates along the floor like that—you'll scuff up the linoleum! With his ankle broken, all we could do was stretch him out on one of our jackets and slide him along until we got back to camp.
See also: slide

slide around

1. To move around (some area) while maintaining smooth, continual contact with the ground. I hate ice skating. I always just spend the whole time sliding around totally out of control. We took off our shoes and started sliding around the floor.
2. To cause someone or something to move around (some area) while maintaining smooth, continual contact with the ground. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "around." Please don't slide those crates around like that—you'll scuff up the linoleum! He lay down on his back, and his friends slid him around the gymnasium.
See also: around, slide

slide by

1. To move past (someone or something) while having smooth, continual contact with the ground. She fell on the ice while she was skating and slid by a bunch of popular kids from school. We were having coffee by the window of the restaurant when suddenly a huge truck went sliding by.
2. Of time, to pass very quickly and unnoticeably. These summer days just slide by, don't they? I can't believe it's nearly August already! The years keep sliding by faster and faster.
3. To progress through something, such as school, a project, one's job, etc., with a minimal amount of effort or attention. I've been really bored with my job, and I feel like I've just been sliding by lately. If you think you can slide by the whole semester and still pass this course, you are sadly mistaken!
See also: by, slide

slide down

1. To maintain smooth, continual contact while moving down (something). Come on, just grab the pole and slide down! The crate fell out of the truck and slid the whole way down the hill.
2. To cause someone or something to move down or along (something) while maintaining smooth, continual contact. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "down." The wardrobe is too heavy to lift, so just slide it down the stairs. She hooked the bag onto the zipline and slid it down to the people below.
3. To move something down and inside of some article of clothing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "down." She slapped him in the face when he tried to slide his hand down her shirt. The clump of snow fell on the nape of my neck and slid down my jacket.
See also: down, slide

slide down from (something)

1. To move down from some higher thing or position maintaining smooth, continual contact with some surface. Come on, just grab the pole and slide down from up there! The crate fell out of the truck and slid down from the top of the hill.
2. To cause someone or something to move down from or along (something) while maintaining smooth, continual contact. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "down from." We'll need to slide the wardrobe down from the top of the upstairs. She hooked the bag onto the zipline and slid it down from the tower to the people below.
See also: down, slide

slide into (someone or something)

1. To collide with someone or something after slipping or gliding along some surface. She fell on the ice while she was skating and slid straight into the boy from school that she liked. The driver slammed on the brakes, but the bus still slid into the car ahead of it.
2. To enter some thing, place, or area after slipping or gliding along some surface. The motorcycle was knocked over by the truck and went sliding into the intersection. The driver slammed on the brakes, but the bus still slid into the car ahead of it.
3. To cause someone or something slip or glide along some surface so as to enter into some thing, place, or area. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "into." The crate was too heavy to lift, so we had to use a ramp and slide it into the back of the truck. We laid the wounded soldier on one of our jackets and slid him into the underbrush to avoid enemy detection.
4. To fit into a particular thing, place, or spot smoothly or with minimal effort. The cable should slide into the slot without any resistance. This module slides into the mainframe, allowing you to expand its processing power significantly.
5. To insert or slot something into a particular thing, place, or area smoothly or with minimal effort. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "into." She slid the CD into the stereo and cranked the volume up. You'll need to slide this USB flash drive into the right slot on the computer.
6. To enter into some situation in an effortless or inconspicuous manner. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slide" and "into." We're hoping the new project manager will be able to slide into the role fairly seamlessly so that there aren't any further disruptions to the project. The politician rode a wave of popularity to slide into a position on parliament.
See also: slide

slide in

1. To enter or slot into some place, area, or thing, especially when space is limited. A: "Would you mind giving me a ride home?" B: "Sure, no problem. Go ahead and slide in next to Jeff in the back seat." We'll need to find a spot in the living room where this bookshelf can slide in.
2. To insert or place someone something into a particular spot or location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "slide" and "in." The classroom is a little bit crowded, but I'm sure we'll be able to slide you in somewhere. I'm thinking that we'll slide in a dresser between the bed and our wall.
3. To enter into some situation in an effortless or inconspicuous manner. We're hoping the new project manager will be able to slide in fairly seamlessly so that there aren't any further disruptions to the project. You think you can slide in and replace my dad just because you've been out on a few dates with my mom?
See also: slide

slide out

1. To exit or eject (from some place, area, or thing) in a smooth, effortless, or inconspicuous manner. I slid out of the room before the teacher noticed me. Once you release the catch, the disk drive should slide right out!
2. To cause or force someone or something to exit or eject (from some place, area, or thing) in a smooth, effortless, or inconspicuous manner. He slid his son out of the wet clothes and wrapped him up in a warm, fluffy towel. You'll need to be very careful when you slide out the cable.
See also: out, slide

slide out of (something or some place)

1. To exit or eject from some place, area, or thing in a smooth, effortless, or inconspicuous manner. I slid out of the room before the teacher noticed me. Once you release the catch, the drive should slide right out of the mainframe.
2. To cause or force someone or something to exit or eject from some place, area, or thing in a smooth, effortless, or inconspicuous manner. He slid his son out of the wet clothes and wrapped him up in a warm, fluffy towel. You'll need to be very careful when you slide the metal sheeting out of the container.
See also: of, out, slide

slide over

1. To slip across the edge of something and fall down. He lost his footing and slid over the side of the roof, breaking his ankle in the fall. The car lost control on the ice and slid over the cliff.
2. To cause someone or something to move closer (to someone or something else) while maintaining smooth, continual contact with some surface. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "slide" and "over." Slide over the contract so I can have a look at the fine print. Slide the patient over on the trolley so we can examine him in the light.
3. To move one's position so as to make more space available for another person. Tom, would you slide over and make some room for Jack at the table? I wish this car ahead of us would just shove over a tiny bit so we could pass him!
See also: over, slide

slide along

to slip or glide along. The sled slid along at a good clip down the gently sloping hill. We slid along on the icy roads and had a hard time stopping and turning.
See also: slide

slide around

to slip or skid around. Many cars slide around on the roads when they are icy. The pedestrians were sliding around on the icy pavement.
See also: around, slide

slide by

to get along with a minimum of effort. she didn't do a lot of workshe just slid by. Don't just slide by. Put in some effort.
See also: by, slide

slide down something

to slip down something, such as a pole. The fire captain slid down the pole and ran to the engine. Please don't slide down the stairs. You'll ruin the carpet.
See also: down, slide

slide over something

to slip or glide over something. The car almost slid over the edge of the cliff. We almost slid over the edge.
See also: over, slide

slide something around

to push, twist, or turn something around. (The thing must be movable, but not often on wheels.) Please slide the carton around and look at the address on the other side. Can you slide the refrigerator around so I can clean the back of it?
See also: around, slide
References in classic literature ?
Richard slid his eyes over her uneasily once, and never looked at her again.
The wall behind him oozed with damp, which collected into drops and slid down.
Beneath them the water slid foaming down a smooth-faced rock to the lip, whence it leaped clear--a pulsating ribbon of white, a-breath with movement, ever falling and ever remaining, changing its substance but never its form, an aerial waterway as immaterial as gauze and as permanent as the hills, that spanned space and the free air from the lip of the rock to the tops of the trees far below, into whose green screen it disappeared to fall into a secret pool.
There was naught to show of his existence, save the marks of Comanche's hoofs on the road and of his body where it had slid over the brink.
In the distance, a great white mass lazily rose, and rising higher and higher, and disentangling itself from the azure, at last gleamed before our prow like a snow-slide, new slid from the hills.
1 : to move or cause to move smoothly over a surface : glide <Skaters slid over the ice.